A Plan to Defeat HPV

In a recent blog post titled “HPV and a Vaccine: Why We Can Beat Cervical Cancer,” William Smith, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors, looks in depth at the conundrum of cervical cancer in the US today. On one hand, we can now classify cervical cancer as a largely preventable disease. On the other, more than 4,000 women in the US still die from cervical cancer each year. If we are to drive these numbers down, HPV vaccination must play an essential role.

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers in women; penile and anal cancers in men; and throat, esophageal, and other head and neck cancers in both sexes. The HPV vaccine has the potential to protect young women—and men—from many, if not all, of these cancers. Recommended for girls and women ages 9–26 and boys and men ages 11–26, HPV vaccination works best if given before any exposure to HPV or the onset of sexual activity. But despite the recommendations of ACOG and other health organizations and women’s advocates, vaccination rates have remained low.

Many parents are sensitive to discussions regarding their young daughters (and sons) and sexually transmitted infections (STI). However difficult the concept, parents would be remiss in avoiding a potentially life-saving vaccine for these reasons. HPV vaccination is just another tool in a parent’s arsenal to shield their children and family from cancer. It’s no different than routinely vaccinating infants against hepatitis B—another STI that can increase the risk of liver cancer—which has been commonplace for roughly 30 years.

As a parent, some things just make good sense. And with the benefits that it provides, HPV vaccination is clearly one of those things. Protect your children; get them vaccinated.