The ACA and OTC Medications – What Physicians Need to Know About Changes in Coverage

January 1 has come and gone, but many of us are unaware of some of the changes with the Affordable Care Act, particularly related to coverage of medications and supplements that became effective in 2014. For our patients who are enrolled in ACA-compliant plans, certain over-the-counter (OTC) medications are now covered at no cost when written as a prescription. Translation: Write prescriptions for these medications when medically necessary.

As an example, aspirin is now a covered medication under the ACA for women ages 55–79 when the benefit of reducing heart attacks outweighs the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. The cost of OTC emergency contraception is also covered if a prescription is written for it. Vitamin D supplements are covered for women ages 65 and older to prevent fractures. And folic acid supplements are covered for women capable of becoming pregnant.

This change in insurance coverage comes at a time when research is looking closely at the benefits of supplements. Certainly all of us are confused at times when related research appears in the media and the benefits of vitamins and supplements are questioned. That’s why we as physicians need to make recommendations to our patients based on their individual needs. This ensures that reproductive-age women don’t forgo important and proven supplements—for instance, folic acid to reduce birth defects like spina bifida—based on a single study.

As physicians, we are in a position to not only recommend, but to reinforce the use of these medications and vitamin supplements for preventive health. It’s up to us health care providers to recommend and prescribe them.

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