Breastfeeding in the Headlines

Breastmilk is easier to digest than formula, and contains antibodies that protect against infections, allergies, inflammatory bowel disease and sudden infant death syndrome. The benefits of breastfeeding extend into adulthood, with lower rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease risk factors, diabetes and some types of cancers. Nursing mothers also enjoy benefits such as reduced risk for breast cancer, ovarian cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease.

There is no shortage of evidence showing the value of breastfeeding for both women and their infants.  And yet, studies show that while most women in the United States initiate breastfeeding, more than half wean earlier than they desire. Barriers to breastfeeding can have a dramatic impact on the likelihood a mother will continue to nurse her child.  Common barriers include a women’s socioeconomic status, education, misconceptions, and social norms. For example, barriers such as the need to return to work sooner after giving birth and employment in positions that make breastfeeding at work more difficult contribute to lower rates of breast feeding among low-income women than women with higher incomes.

While the Affordable Care Act includes provisions to support breastfeeding mothers, there is more to be done. Supporting a woman’s decision to breast-feed takes a multifaceted approach, including advancing public policies like paid family leave, access to quality child care, break time, and a location other than a bathroom for expressing milk.

As ob-gyns and advocates for women’s health, we can also support women to achieve their infant feeding goals directly through patient care. According to  ACOG Committee Opinion NO. 658, Ob-gyns and other obstetric care providers should:

  • Develop and maintain knowledge and skills in anticipatory guidance, physical assessment and support for normal breastfeeding physiology, and management of common complications of lactation.
  • Support each woman’s informed decision about whether to initiate or continue breastfeeding, recognizing that she is uniquely qualified to decide whether exclusive breastfeeding, mixed feeding, or formula feeding is optimal for her and her infant.
  • Support women in integrating breastfeeding into their daily lives in the community and in the workplace.
  • Be a resource for breastfeeding women through the infant’s first year of life, and for those who continue beyond the first year.

ACOG strongly supports breastfeeding and provides resources for both you and your patients. I encourage you to visit acog.org/breastfeeding to learn more.

Let’s Speak Up for Title X

Last month, the Department of Health and Human Services announced proposed changes to the rules governing the Title X program. Created in 1970, Title X is the only federally funded grant program exclusively dedicated to providing low-income patients, including adolescents, with essential family planning and preventive health services and information.

The Title X program is an important thread in the fabric of women’s health care. As the only federal grant program of its sort, Title X plays a vital role in ensuring that safe, timely, and evidence based care is available to every woman regardless of her financial circumstances.  However, the proposed changes fundamentally change the nature of the Title X program by restricting access to essential preventive care, interfering in the patient-physician relationship and making it harder for women to make timely, informed decisions about their care. These limitations and restrictions undermine our ability to offer patients medically accurate, comprehensive care.

As ob-gyns, we know the essential role contraception plays in our patients’ lives. Contraception is cost-effective, reduces unintended pregnancy and abortion rates, and allows women to have more control over their reproductive health. It also allows women and their families to achieve greater educational, financial, and professional success and stability. Title X plays an essential role in ensuring these choices are accessible to every woman. No patient should have to sacrifice safety or efficacy because no better options are available to her.

Moreover, Title X does not just address family planning needs, but also routine preventive care. Health centers that receive Title X funds also provide services like well woman exams, breast and cervical cancer screenings, screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections, testing for HIV, pregnancy testing and counseling, and other patient education and/or health referrals.  These services save women’s lives.

The proposed changes also raise specific concerns about government interference in the practice of medicine. While Title X funds have never been permitted to be used for abortion care, the proposed changes take a further step to exclude qualified providers from participating in the Title X program. This puts access to essential care at risk for 40 percent of Title X’s four million patients.  ACOG opposes any effort to exclude qualified providers from federal programs.

We oppose political efforts to direct health care providers to withhold information or rely on non-evidence based counseling methods. We consider any effort to move away from science-based principles to be interference in the patient-physician relationship.  Women count on their providers for clear medical information. The government should not limit what information women can know or what kinds options she should be given.

This level of interference in the practice of medicine would set a dangerous precedent for all areas of medicine.

In practice, these changes will have the most profound impact on low income women and women of color, the very patients this program was created to serve. We cannot accept less access or fewer options for some patients simply by circumstances of their geography or finances.

Your voice can make a difference on this important issue. Over the course of the next few weeks, we will be asking you to engage in advocacy on this issue, including submitting comments. In July, ACOG  members will receive a sample comment template to use.

Thank you in advance for joining me in ensuring that women have continued access to high quality, medically accurate reproductive and preventative health care through Title X. It’s essential to women’s health.

Communities at Risk: Suicide Rates Rising Across the U.S.

The loss of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain last week is a reminder that depression and suicide can affect anyone.  There has been a 30% rise in suicide rates from 1999 to 2016, according to a report on released by the CDC on June 7, 2018. Suicide increased in almost every state, and killed more Americans ages 10 or older than homicides did nationally. CDC Principal Deputy Director Anne Schuchat noted, “Suicide is a leading cause of death for Americans – and it’s a tragedy for families and communities across the country.”

As physicians, we are not immune to the realities of suicide.  Physicians suffer from higher rates of burnout, depressive symptoms, and suicide risk than the general population. Suicide generally is caused by the convergence of multiple risk factors — the most common being untreated or inadequately managed mental health conditions.12

The suicide rate among male physicians is 1.41 times higher than the general male population. And among female physicians, the relative risk is even more pronounced — 2.27 times greater than the general female population.3  According to one study, physicians who took their lives were less likely to be receiving mental health treatment compared with non-physicians who took their lives even though depression was found to be a significant risk factor at approximately the same rate in both groups.

What can you do? Know the signs and don’t be afraid to ask for help. As physicians we also need to take care of ourselves. Past ACOG President Dr. Mark De Francesco’s task force on physician wellness compiled several resources for ob-gyns to help cope with several issues such as adverse events and burnout. You can find additional resources here.

Ob-gyns also have a unique opportunity to play a pivotal in women’s mental health. ACOG recommends screening for depression at least once in the perinatal period. Visit ACOG’s resource overview on depression and postpartum depression for more information.

More recently, ACOG also released two new committee opinions pertinent to helping ob-gyns address mental health. In Committee Opinion 736: Optimizing Postpartum Care,ACOG emphasizes the importance of the fourth trimester. By increasing touch points with patients and asking questions, ob-gyns can better understand and assist new mothers. Committee Opinion 740: Gynecologic Care for Adolescents and Young Women with Eating Disorders highlights how the annual well women visit can serve as a women’s gateway to other health services, including mental health or behavioral health services.

Don’t underestimate the value of simply listening. If you know someone who might be suffering from suicidal thoughts, visit the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline or call 800-273-TALK.

At the Heart of Patient Care

More than 90 percent of women have at least one risk factor for heart disease, yet most women are unaware that heart disease is their leading cause of death in the United States.  Less than half (39%) of primary care physicians, including ob-gyns, consider cardiovascular disease to be a top concern for women.

Last month, ACOG and the American Health Association released a joint advisory calling on ob-gyns to use annual well woman exams as an opportunity to assess a woman’s risk for heart disease.  For many women, their ob-gyn is the only physician they see routinely, particularly women during their childbearing years. This emphasizes the important role of the ob-gyn to identify risk factors for heart disease and stroke—long before clinical signs are apparent.  Not doing so is a missed opportunity for early detection and intervention.

Research shows that pregnant women with complications like preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and growth restricted babies, have three times the risk of later cardiovascular disease than women without these pregnancy complications.  Additionally, cardiovascular events and cardiomyopathy are the leading causes of maternal mortality in the U.S., together accounting for 25 percent of all maternal deaths.

As the leading health care providers for women, we can be a powerful voice for patients, counseling and educating them on how to achieve and maintain long-term heart health. Whether it’s advising patients about healthy diet and lifestyle, or taking advantage of high-tech solutions such as software algorithms that can trigger patient education and referrals by analyzing data contained in electronic medical records, the well woman exam is an opportunity for us to deliver patient-centered care.

I’m so excited to share more with you during my year in office, and to hear from you directly. Connect with me on twitter at @TXmommydoc.

Guest Blog: We Took AIM at Maternal Mortality and Made a Difference

No woman should die on what ought to be the happiest day of her life. Yet that is exactly what’s happening in the United States at a rate unmatched in the developed world. ProPublica-NPR recently highlighted the realities of maternal mortality in an article about a 36-year-old African-American mother—an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—who died after giving birth from complications of high blood pressure.

The rates of maternal mortality in our home state of Michigan are stunning. There are 10.6 pregnancy-related deaths per 100,000 women, and African-American women die at a rate that is 4.9 times higher than white women. There are many causes of maternal death. The leading causes include heart attack or heart failure, stroke from high blood pressure, severe bleeding, serious infection, and blood clots. And, as more pregnant women have chronic health conditions such as obesity and heart disease, they become more likely to die during or after pregnancy. Even more startling is that, for every woman who dies, there are 100 more who suffer severe maternal morbidity—life-threatening injuries, infection, or disease due to chronic or acute conditions

Last month, the Alliance for Innovation for Maternal Health (AIM), a national initiative championed by 19 women’s health care organizations including ACOG, has already shown early steps toward reducing severe maternal morbidity. The goal of AIM is to reduce preventable maternal mortality and morbidity through hospital implementation of proactive patient safety bundles and resources for common pregnancy-related complications, such as preeclampsia and hemorrhage.

In 2015, Michigan became one of the first eight states to join AIM. ACOG’s Michigan Section teamed up with the Michigan Health & Hospital Association and the Michigan Department of Health & Human Services, along with the American College of Nurse Midwives and the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetrical and Neonatal Nurses to align resources and work cohesively as a single initiative for all birthing hospitals in the state. The initiative is called MIAM.

Roughly 80 hospitals in Michigan have committed to implementing the AIM safety bundles. They have also committed to collecting and reporting data on maternal outcomes to drive quality improvement. This reporting allows hospitals of similar size and capacity to assess and compare their performance and progress.

While this type of work requires a culture shift that will take time to fully adopt, we are already seeing dramatic improvements in maternal health. In Michigan alone, there has been a

  • 10.5 percent decrease in severe maternal morbidity since 2016
  • 17.9 percent decrease for other complications during labor and delivery among women who experience hemorrhage
  • Five percent decrease among women who experience hypertension

Recent data from four of the original eight AIM states, which collectively represent 266,717 births, also shows a marked difference in maternal outcomes. There has been a 20 percent decrease in the severe maternal morbidity rate.

Mother’s Day is a good reminder that we as health care providers must resolve to remain diligent in our efforts to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity. We commend each of our AIM hospitals and urge hospital administrators to stay focused on the task at hand: to provide the necessary support to make the AIM initiative a priority so we can succeed at keeping mothers safe.

For a long time, Michigan hasn’t been the safest place for moms—especially African-American moms—to give birth. The good news is that, over the past few years, the numbers have been finally going in the right direction. We are poised to continue making improvements and ensuring that every mom can safely give birth in Michigan, and every state in the country.

Written by ACOG Members Jody Jones, MD, and Matt Allswede, MD

We MUST Do Better on Maternal Health

The first time I saw a new mother die, I was early in my career. A healthy, young woman had a complication during labor and needed a C-section. While the care team delivered a healthy baby, the mother never regained consciousness and eventually passed away. I remember seeing her husband late that night in the hospital, holding his new baby. It was supposed to be the happiest moment of his life, but instead he looked completely lost.

That moment had a profound effect on me and is one of the reasons I’ve committed my career—and now my ACOG presidency—to reducing preventable maternal mortality. As I said last week at the 2018 ACOG Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas, where I was sworn in as the 69th president of ACOG, “To achieve our full potential not just as women, but as a country, and as a global community, the health of women MUST be a priority.”

As ob-gyns, we dedicate our lives to advancing women’s health, and there is no contradiction more stunning than the rise of maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States. While other countries have been able to reduce maternal deaths over the last 20 years, the U.S. continues to see rates grow. Worse yet, African American women are two to four times as likely to die from pregnancies than Caucasian women.

During my year as president, ACOG will continue its good work surrounding the issue of maternal mortality through three initiatives:

  1. Advocacy on the state and federal level to establish maternal mortality reviews. These state-based reviews offer a valuable opportunity to understand maternal death through a detailed review of medical records and autopsy reports. By finding causes of and contributing factors to maternal death, we can identify opportunities to prevent them.
  2.  A stronger culture of patient safety in hospitals. ACOG helped found the Alliance on Innovation on Maternal Health (AIM), a national maternal safety and quality improvement initiative to reduce maternal mortality and severe morbidity. Together with 19 partner women’s health care organizations, ACOG has worked with hospitals and health systems to implement patient safety bundles across the country. Today, 23 states are part of AIM, and it’s our goal to sign on all 50 states.
  3. A taskforce devoted to heart disease in pregnancy. Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in women in the U.S. (400,000 deaths annually), and cardiovascular events and cardiomyopathy are the leading causes of maternal mortality, accounting for nearly 25 percent of deaths. This multidisciplinary taskforce will concentrate on creating evidence-based, best practice guidelines addressing screening for, diagnosis, and management of cardiovascular disease in women, before, during and after pregnancy. It will also address the pregnancy-related contributions to lifelong cardiovascular risk by evaluating the evidence, making recommendations, and prioritizing research that will drive better care.

While I’m excited to have this opportunity to focus on safe motherhood, one of the most enjoyable aspects of this position is to meet you, my fellow members. I look forward to working with you, and our new class of Fellows who took the oath last week, to provide the best clinical care to women of this country. Please connect with me on Twitter @TXmommydoc, and follow @acognews to keep up with the latest news in our profession.