Our Moral Values, Our Core Values

It’s an interesting time for women’s health care, to say the least. With the recent passage of the American Health Care Act by the U.S. House of Representatives, obstetrician-gynecologists are faced with an uncertain political future. You may have the same questions that I do. Will this impact the way we practice and how we provide the best care for our patients?

As I took the reins as the 68th President of The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists last week, I discussed the importance of the Hippocratic Oath, one of the oldest binding commitments in history. Building from the central premise to ‘first do no harm,’ it outlines our responsibilities and obligations as ob-gyns to provide the best evidence-based care to all of our patients. These are our moral values, our core values and as women’s health care provides we have long demonstrated the passion and compassion in the clinical care of our patients.

At medical school graduations and hooding ceremonies at Duke University and many other institutions, all physicians in attendance have the opportunity to reaffirm and recite the Hippocratic Oath with the graduating medical school class. It’s a great reminder of why we do what we do:

“I will apply for the benefit of the sick, all measures that are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.”

“I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability.”

“My responsibilities include those related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.”

Regardless of the political climate, I urge you to remember that we are ACOG: the primary advocate for women’s health care. We cannot waiver on our position on key issues including the primacy of patient welfare, patient autonomy and social justice. These values address our societal contract as physicians; considering the available resources and needs of all while taking care of the individual.

We have many challenges ahead and hurdles to overcome especially in regard to access and affordability of essential benefits for pregnancy care and age appropriate preventative well woman’s screenings. However, we must remain steadfast in our commitment to women’s health care. I look forward to working with you, my colleagues, and our new Fellows who took the oath last week to provide the best clinical care to women of this country.

Ob-Gyns Can Be the Secret Weapon in the Fight Against Heart Disease

As ob-gyns, we know that the care we provide to women goes far beyond reproductive health. Thirty-five percent of women consider their ob-gyn their sole health care provider, putting us in a unique position to address an array of common health conditions. Since heart disease is the number one killer of women—and February is Heart Health Month—now is a good time to remember the part we can play in changing the outcomes of this devastating disease.

Perhaps the biggest threat of heart disease is lack of awareness of the condition’s prevalence and dangers. Though heart disease causes one in three deaths among American women every year—and 90 percent of women have at least one risk factor for developing heart disease—only one in five believes that heart disease is her greatest health threat, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). Equipped with these statistics, ob-gyns should feel confident initiating a conversation with patients about their heart health.

Helping patients address heart disease risk factors, ideally before a heart disease diagnosis, is key. Nearly two-thirds of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For many women, the first signs of heart disease are actually the symptoms of a stroke, heart failure or heart attack, when serious damage may have already occurred. However, a number of risk factors are mostly under a patient’s control: an unhealthy diet and/or lack of exercise (both of which can lead to other important risk factors, including being overweight and having high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and diabetes); smoking; and drinking to excess. When women are educated about how to make important lifestyle changes, it can be lifesaving. According to the AHA, 330 fewer women are dying from heart disease every day as a result of making heart healthy choices.

There are some factors that are out of a patient’s control, including a family history of heart disease, preterm labor and delivery, and preeclampsia. Ob-gyns can play an essential role by communicating the steps women can take to reduce their odds of a heart disease diagnosis. Even by simply acknowledging and discussing the risks, ob-gyns can make a difference. So, while these conversations aren’t always comfortable, they’re important because many women may not be hearing this information from any other health provider.

Lastly, since the symptoms of heart disease are widely misunderstood, particularly in women, it’s critical to share them with at-risk women. While angina is the most common symptom associated with heart disease, women are actually more likely to experience pain in the neck, jaw, throat, abdomen or back; shortness of breath; and nausea/vomiting. Lightheadedness, dizziness or fainting are common signs, as well. These symptoms don’t always occur during exercise or periods of stress; they can happen during rest, too. By ensuring your at-risk patients are aware of these signs, it could mean they get treatment faster, which will ultimately lead to better outcomes.

Ob-gyns have a powerful opportunity to be the secret weapon in the fight against heart disease. We can help inform our patients about the dangers, symptoms, and necessary preventative care. Communicated early and effectively, we can help women manage the factors that are in their control to help them live healthier, longer lives.

We Cannot Afford to Have the Clock Turned Back on Women’s Health

As we begin a new year, a lot is at stake for Americans’ health. Our nation’s leaders have promised substantial changes to the Affordable Care Act, from partial to full repeal, without the certainty of a replacement plan. While it can be easy to get caught up in the politics of health care, as ob-gyns our focus has always been on our patients and ensuring that they have access to safe, high-quality health care. That is why a critical part of our work here at ACOG is to advocate for the health of women, and as millions of people face the possibility of losing health insurance coverage in the coming months or years, ACOG’s work has never been more important.

Earlier this month, ACOG partnered with three leading medical organizations—the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American College of Physicians—to urge Congress to avoid repealing the ACA without an immediate replacement which would protect and retain the landmark women’s health provisions in the law.

The ACA is not perfect. In fact, ACOG didn’t endorse it originally because we felt it didn’t meet the needs of our physician members. However, while there’s lots to improve, the ACA does include really important protections for our patients’ health. Insurers must now cover maternity and preventive care and contraceptives. It stops insurers from charging women more than men for the same coverage, prevents insurers from denying coverage to women who were victims of domestic violence or who had a Cesarean delivery in the past. The ACA also guarantees women direct access to their ob-gyns without any limitations.

The coverage provided under the ACA allowed many women to schedule routine doctor’s appointments for the first time in their lives. We all know that when people have insurance, they’re more likely to use preventive care like mammogram and diabetes screenings that prevent more costly and life threatening health problems down the line.

Whatever one’s reservations may be about the law, as physicians we know how devastating it would be for a cancer patient to suddenly lose her coverage or for a pregnant woman to go without prenatal care and deliver a baby preterm because she could no longer afford health coverage. The fact is, low-income women are more likely to suffer from often preventable pregnancy complications and, unfortunately, that is the very population that stands to lose the most unless Congress protects these important benefits, including Medicaid expansion.

Today, 31 states and D.C. have expanded their Medicaid programs, offering coverage to 11 million newly eligible individuals. The most important part of the expansion to women is that those Medicaid programs cover low-income women even if they’re not pregnant. Regular Medicaid programs routinely only cover pregnant women through delivery and a few weeks after.

But speaking more broadly, all women stand to lose essential preventive care if the ACA is repealed. Access to breast cancer screenings decreases women’s likelihood of dying from the disease by up to 50 percent. Routine cervical screenings decrease the odds of late-stage cancer diagnosis by 60 percent. Finally, when women have access to more choices of affordable and effective contraception, including IUDs and implants, rates of unintended pregnancy, unplanned birth, and abortion drop dramatically.

In 2016 alone, 6.8 million girls and women gained health insurance coverage. If the law is repealed, those gains will likely be lost. We cannot turn back the clock on women’s health. The care we provide doesn’t stop in our exam or delivery rooms. It’s our responsibility to advocate on our patients’ behalf and protect their access to affordable, comprehensive health care. So let’s mobilize and use our collective community’s influence and expertise to ensure access to health care in this country.

To become involved in ACOG’s advocacy efforts, join us at the 35th Congressional Leadership Conference, The President’s Conference in Washington, D.C., in March.

Prevention of Preterm Birth Starts with a Healthy Mom

November 17 is World Prematurity Day. It gives us, as health professionals, an opportunity to direct our attention to a devastating health issue that impacts 15 million babies each year and rededicate ourselves to reducing that number. Several organizations, including ACOG, are supporting the cause through education, awareness, and advocacy events. However, there’s one event in particular that, coincidentally, started this week and stands to make the most significant impact in terms of lowering the preterm birth rate in this country and that’s open enrollment through the Health Insurance Marketplace.

Prevention of preterm birth starts with a healthy mom and that means access to prenatal care and preventive services. There are several risk factors for preterm birth, some of which include high blood pressure, low pre-pregnancy weight, alcohol and drug abuse, smoking, a prior preterm birth and a birth less than 12 months ago. Adequate health insurance coverage can make the difference between a pregnant woman carrying to term or delivering too early and the Affordable Care Act has helped make that coverage accessible to millions of women.

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ACOG Joins National Obesity Care Week 2016: Take 5 to Change the Way We Care

Today, more than a third of the adult population, 36.5 percent, is affected by obesity. The number of adults who are affected by severe obesity continues to rise. It’s time for a change in obesity care. With senocw-supporter-web-visual-copyvere obesity on the rise, our nation, led by the health care community, must attack this disease from multiple angles and unite to overhaul the treatment of obesity. ACOG recognizes the important role that obstetrician-gynecologists play. Ob-gyns often meet their patients at a young age, when obesity is less likely to be an issue. Therefore, we are in an ideal position to help educate women and provide counsel on the importance of a healthy lifestyle and fighting obesity.

The 2nd Annual National Obesity Care Week (NOCW), October 30 through November 5, seeks to ignite a national movement to ensure anyone affected by obesity receives respectful and comprehensive care. ACOG is proud to join the Campaign, which was founded by The Obesity Society, the Obesity Action Coalition, Strategies to Overcome and Prevent Obesity Alliance and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.

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“AIM”ing to Reduce U.S. Maternal Mortality

During the past several weeks, you would be hard-pressed not to find an article about the dismal maternal mortality rates in this country. In fact, it was a study published in our very own Green Journal that sparked the latest national conversation (with Texas at the epicenter) about why the most modern, industrialized country in the world is failing so miserably at reducing the numbers of deaths associated with pregnancy and childbirth. However, the truth of the matter is, we already know why.

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World Contraception Day

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Today, September 26th, is World Contraception Day (WCD). Now in its ninth year, WCD envisions a world where every pregnancy is wanted and women are empowered with the resources and knowledge to make informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health. Part of the larger Family Planning 2020 mission, WCD takes a multi-faceted approach to women’s health, encouraging increased sexual education, improved access to health care services, and eliminating challenges to cultural taboos based on myth or misconception.

As women’s health care providers, this mission aligns with our everyday efforts.  We counsel and educate our patients, helping their personal and professional goals align with their sexual and reproductive choices. Empowering women with choice and control over their contraceptive choices and family planning leads to happy and healthy individuals and families. Continue reading

Setting the Record Straight on Drinking During Pregnancy

When confronted with so many different types of infections and viruses that can threaten the health of an unborn baby, it’s unfortunate that drinking during pregnancy is still the leading cause of birth defects in this country and abroad. Without knowledge of the devastating effects, it’s easy to have a casual attitude toward drinking but when a fetus is exposed to any amount of alcohol it can lead to a number of permanent and debilitating conditions. These are known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and can include anything from severe brain damage and growth deficits to lifelong learning and behavioral problems in children. September is designated as FASD Awareness Month but my hope is that at some point in the near future there is no longer a need to observe it because the fact is—FASD is 100 percent preventable.

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Ob-Gyns Can Empower Women to Choose Breastfeeding

Only 22 percent of mothers in the United States are exclusively breastfeeding their babies at six months. Although most U.S. women initiate breastfeeding, more than half wean earlier than they desire and fall short of their personal goals. These are startling statistics given all the research and evidence we have that shows how beneficial it can be for both women and babies. That says to me that we, as providers, can do more to empower women with the knowledge to make this critical decision. As National Breastfeeding Month comes to a close, it seems like an appropriate time to remind us how important our guidance really is and the potential impact it could make on health outcomes.

There are many barriers to successful breastfeeding but I believe the key to overcoming them starts with education—the one factor that physicians have the most control over. Misinformation can often be the culprit when it comes to a mother making the decision not to breastfeed. Discussions about breastfeeding should be integrated into maternity care. Providers should obtain a thorough history and find out early what expectant mothers know or have heard about breastfeeding. Often times, it’s as simple as mitigating fears regarding pain associated with breastfeeding and letting mothers know that it might not come naturally at first and that, with the right support, techniques are learned and will improve over time. Providers should respect and support a woman’s informed decision whether to initiate or continue breastfeeding, as each woman is uniquely qualified to decide which feeding option is best for herself and her infant.  However, pregnant mothers take their doctors’ advice seriously, so we shouldn’t underestimate our influence. By saying nothing, we imply that it doesn’t matter—and it does.

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Immunization is Crucial for Pregnant Patients and Their Babies

As ob-gyns, we know the important role that vaccination plays in the health of mother and baby. It is one of our best options in reducing their chances of morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases. Additionally, vaccination helps prevents the spread of certain infectious diseases.

The fall is usually when we start reminding women to get their annual flu vaccine, especially if they are pregnant. However, recent reports of whooping cough (pertussis) and measles exposure underscore the need to discuss other vaccinations with our patients. August is National Immunization Awareness Month and a great time to talk to your pregnant patients about immunization.

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