It’s Time We Talk About Endometriosis

Endometriosis—when the uterine lining grows outside of the uterus, resulting in severe pain, swelling and bleeding—is thought to affect more than 11 percent of all American women between the ages of 15 and 44. This condition impacts 6.5 million U.S. women, and 176 million women worldwide. Yet, it is still not easily recognized. It takes about 10 years from when women experience their first symptoms to receive an endometriosis diagnosis—half that time to recognize and bring up symptoms to a doctor and the other half for the doctor to diagnose it. For Endometriosis Awareness Month this March, we as obstetrician-gynecologists must do our part to raise awareness about the condition with our patients, strive to improve our understanding of the disease, and ensure more timely and accurate diagnoses.

Improving awareness and timely diagnosis of endometriosis helps women avoid unnecessary pain, and decrease infertility rates. Around 40 percent of all women with infertility have endometriosis and, of women diagnosed with endometriosis, about 40 percent experience fertility challenges. Many women struggling with infertility remain undiagnosed; others won’t be diagnosed with endometriosis until they start to experience problems conceiving. It falls to ob-gyns to reverse this trend, particularly as 63 percent of general practitioners feel uncomfortable diagnosing and treating patients with endometriosis, and as many as half are unfamiliar with the three main symptoms of the disease.

Early endometriosis diagnosis and treatment lead to better outcomes. Careful listening and discussion are integral to early detection, as many common symptoms are not so obvious, such as chronic lower back pain and intestinal problems like diarrhea, constipation, bloating and nausea. We can also look for indicators that a woman is at greater risk of having endometriosis, including if she’s in her 30s and 40s; has a close relative who has been diagnosed with endometriosis (which increases risk by five to seven times); and has a higher body mass index (which is thought to promote the development of endometriosis because fat increases estrogen levels).

Raising awareness about endometriosis and increasing its timely diagnosis improves women’s lives. While symptoms may range in terms of severity, nearly all of them take a physical toll on a woman’s day-to-day life—from increasing tiredness to limiting her physical capabilities. It’s time to talk with our patients more regularly about endometriosis, and ensure more women are getting the care and support they need.

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