Conversations with Pregnant Patients Should Include Discussions About Infant Immunization Plans

This week is National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), a time devoted to promoting the benefits of vaccination and to improve the health of children two years old or younger. As ob-gyns our active role in a baby’s health care often ends once a mother is discharged following delivery, but we play an important role in preparing women to tend to their infant child’s needs, including planning for immunization.

Pregnant women and infants are among the most vulnerable during infectious disease outbreaks. I’ve written before about ob-gyns responsibility to educate women about getting vaccinated during pregnancy, underscoring that immunization is essential to the health of both mother and fetus. Building women’s awareness about the importance of immunization during pregnancy also opens the door to discuss the importance of continuing immunization efforts into infancy and onward.

The positive outcomes associated with immunizing infants cannot be overstated. Though it’s hard for many to recall, there was a time where many infants and young children faced high risk of life threatening and debilitating illnesses. Many of these, like measles and polio, have been greatly reduced, almost eliminated due to population wide vaccination. We can protect children under the age of two from 14 different diseases, which is estimated to prevent 20 million cases of disease and about 42,000 deaths. While we should be heartened by these positive numbers, the key to keeping these infectious diseases at bay is ensuring parents understand that vaccination is safe and essential to the health of every child.

NIIW is a great time to renew efforts to educate patients about vaccine preventable diseases, and the positive impact vaccination has on all our lives. To make following immunization guidelines as straight forward as possible, ACOG has compiled all our immunization guidelines on one page, available here. Additionally, during a woman’s pregnancy, ob-gyns should encourage thinking about and planning for the infant’s health care. We can help by making referrals to pediatricians and directing women to resources that outline an infant’s necessary care, including immunization. The CDC prepares immunization schedules by age as a quick and helpful resource for providers, and childhood immunization schedule generators for parents, from age 0 to 6.

We are fortunate to live in a time where vaccination protects from some of history’s most devastating infectious diseases. We must continue to educate and support patients’ understanding about the overwhelming benefits of immunization for themselves and their children.

 

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About Tom Gellhaus, MD

Tom Gellhaus, MD is ACOG President through 2017. He is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, Iowa. Dr. Gellhaus graduated from Yankton High School in Yankton, South Dakota, received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Chemistry from Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota and his Doctor of Medicine Degree from the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He completed his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Following residency, he entered private practice in Davenport, Iowa and after 20 years in private practice, he returned to academic medicine at the University of Iowa.

Over the past 20 years, Dr. Gellhaus has served in many ACOG positions at the local, regional, national and international levels. Dr. Gellhaus’ interests are in the areas of health care advocacy and policy. He has also been very involved and active in global healthcare. He has completed the McCain Fellowship, a month long in-depth experience in advocacy, at ACOG in Washington, D.C. in 1999. In 2001, he was a Primary Care Policy Fellow with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He has remained active in Advocacy and Policy as a member of ACOG’s Government Affairs Committee and the Ob/Gyn PAC. Dr. Gellhaus has also been very active in leading groups on short-term medical and surgical mission projects for the last 20 years. He has done numerous presentations about these short-term medical and surgical mission projects throughout the United States.

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