Big HIV News and An Important Reminder

Earlier this week it was reported that a Mississippi toddler born with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) apparently cleared her HIV infection and is now disease-free. The story of her innovative medical treatment and remarkable results is truly exciting. However, as an ob-gyn, I can’t help but think that this entire situation could have been avoided.

Today in the US, mother-to-child transmission of HIV is a rare occurrence. HIV-positive women have roughly a 2% chance of passing along the virus to their babies. This is due in large part to increased HIV screening among pregnant women. Those who test positive for HIV during pregnancy can begin treatment with antiretroviral medications before they give birth. These medications significantly reduce the risk that a child will be born with HIV. The earlier the medication is given during pregnancy, the better, but it can still have a positive effect when administered just 24–48 hours before delivery and/or to the newborn within the first two days of life.

ACOG recommends that all pregnant women be screened for HIV as a part of routine prenatal care. Repeat third-trimester testing is also recommended for pregnant women in areas with high HIV prevalence. Not all women receive prenatal care, and it’s not uncommon for ob-gyns to see women for the first time when they come to the hospital to deliver. In this case, rapid HIV testing can confirm a woman’s HIV status. If she tests positive, she may still be able to receive medication in time to protect her baby from infection.

I cannot stress enough the importance of knowing your HIV status. Screening is the best method we have to both head off HIV transmission to infants and stop the spread of the disease to people of all ages. In addition to the screening recommendations for pregnant women, ACOG also recommends that all women ages 19–64 be routinely screened for HIV, regardless of individual risk factors.

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