Men’s Health Matters to Ob-Gyns

“Movember.” That’s the subject line of a recent email that landed in my inbox.

Movember?

My first reaction was that this was a misspelling. Then I thought, what the heck is that? It turns out that my male ob-gyn colleagues have decided to draw attention to men’s health by shaving their mustaches and beards at the start of the month. They’re having a contest to judge who grows the best mustache and beard by month’s end, all in the spirit of men’s health. Why? They want to ‘change the face’ of men’s health through awareness and education.

Launched in 2003 in Australia, Movember is now a global effort in which men grow a “Mo” (moustache) for 30 days during the month of November in an effort to raise awareness about men’s health.

What better way to raise awareness of men’s health than through ob-gyns? After all, we know that women tend to make health care decisions for the family, and often a woman is the one to bring (or drag!) her partner or parent in to the doctor for care. Perhaps if we share some men’s health statistics with our patients, the messages will reach more men. Movember has certainly created a buzz around my entire department, and often that “buzzzzzz” is the key to messaging.

Here are some key messages about men’s health to consider (from the us.movember.com website):

  • 24% of men are less likely to go to the doctor compared with women.
  • 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime. In 2013, more than 238,000 new cases of the disease will be diagnosed and almost 30,000 men will die from it.
  • Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in males between the ages of 15 and 35. In 2013, 7,920 men will be diagnosed with testicular cancer and 370 will die from it.
  • 1 in 13 men will be diagnosed with lung cancer in his lifetime.
  • While not common, men can get breast cancer. About 2,240 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed among men and about 410 will die from it in 2013.
  • An estimated 13 million men, or 11.8% of all men over the age of 20, have diabetes.
  • More than 6 million men are diagnosed with depression each year. Almost four times as many males as females die by suicide each year.

As arguments continue around the Affordable Care Act, my message remains consistent: Prevention matters. We need to do everything we can to make healthy lifestyle choices for ourselves and our families. Regardless of whether it’s a male or a female, whether it’s prenatal care for a woman or aneurysm screening for a man—preventive health care is an investment in this AND future generations. Preventive health care is something we should all support.

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