Vaccine Safety Facts: Overcoming the Hype

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week, a time for ob-gyns and health professionals to encourage the annual flu vaccine for everyone 6 months and older, including pregnant women. We’ve all seen the numbers on the many millions of lives that have been saved by the flu vaccine and other vaccinations. Vaccines have been a major public health triumph. In fact, they have been so successful that the average American has fortunately never personally seen a single case of polio or even measles, diseases that were commonplace and often deadly not so long ago. So getting everyone vaccinated should be easy, right?

Yet, we sometimes encounter resistance from our patients who may have heard myths and inaccuracies about vaccines. That’s especially true when vaccine safety has been in the news, as it’s been over the past few weeks, this time related to the HPV vaccine. While this type of sensational media coverage can be frustrating, we must focus on our role as health care providers to be the experts, to dispel the myths, and to provide the facts.

How can we overcome the vaccine hype? By sharing these and other key vaccine facts with our patients, consistently and regularly:

Vaccine Facts

Fact: More than 100 million diseases have been prevented because of vaccinations in the US alone.

Fact: Vaccines are safe. Extensive research has found no link between vaccines and autism or other serious health conditions.

HPV Vaccine Facts

Fact: The HPV vaccine is safe.

Fact: The HPV vaccine is nearly 100% effective in preventing cervical cancer caused by certain HPV strains.

Flu Vaccine Facts

Fact: Getting the flu vaccine does not cause the flu.

Fact: It’s safe for pregnant women to get the flu vaccine.

As ob-gyns, we are in a unique position to educate women about the facts on vaccines. Together with our patients, we can be more effective than the hype of an uninformed or misguided spokespeople who knowingly or unknowingly undermines the value of vaccines. The overwhelming evidence is clear—vaccines are safe and effective, and we need to take every opportunity to communicate these facts to our patients.

For more information on immunizations, go to www.immunizationforwomen.org.

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