Have We Really “Come a Long Way, Baby?”

Fifty years ago, Surgeon General Luther Terry submitted a landmark report linking smoking to illness and death and said the government should do something to curb tobacco use. At the time, a third of American women were regular smokers. Today, the rate is down to 16%.

There was a time when smoking was portrayed as glamorous. Now we know that smoking negatively impacts every body organ and is the leading cause of premature death for adults. Women smokers have greater risks of reproductive health problems, many forms of gynecological and other cancers, heart disease, chronic obstructive lung disease, and osteoporosis. Quitting smoking is one of the most important things a pregnant woman can do for her and her baby’s health.

There are a number of effective methods to help our patients stop smoking, and we should be as familiar with them as we are with methods of birth control. These include using the 5 As (Ask, Assess, Advise, Assist, and Arrange follow-up), referring patients to the smokers’ quit line (1-800-Quit Now), and prescribing therapy to ease nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine replacement and medication improve the chances for sustained smoking cessation in non-pregnant women by 20–36%.

Of course, ACOG has several great tools and resources to help ob-gyns and their practices address tobacco use.

So, yes, we have come a long way toward reducing women’s smoking, but we can’t stop now. We need to continue making it a priority to counsel our patients about the health hazards of smoking and offer them help in quitting. And we can have an impact in our communities by promoting hefty taxation on tobacco products and supporting clean air legislation.

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