The Key to Women’s Health: Collaboration

Collaborative practice is the true hallmark of highly-functioning ob-gyn practices and medical systems. When we use the term ‘collaborative practice,’ we need to focus on the elements that make collaboration a success for our patients.

ACOG benefits when we collaborate with our partner organizations to improve women’s health. The past two weeks have demonstrated extraordinary collaboration.

Dr. Haywood Brown, Chair of District IV, recently led ACOG’s new Well-Woman Task Force, gathering experts from numerous specialties, including physicians from family practice, ob-gyn, pediatrics, and internal medicine, along with nurse midwives, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. He asked his colleagues to collaborate and define the elements of the annual well-woman visit. Women see a variety of health care practitioners, so we need to ensure that we are consistently addressing the same common elements during a well-woman visit, regardless of patient age or health care provider. The meeting brought focus to the importance of ‘Every Woman, Every Time’ that places women’s health and reproductive needs together.

Carrying on with the collaborative theme, the Council on Patient Safety in Women’s Health Care, convened under Dr. Paul Gluck’s expertise, brought together ob-gyns, family practice doctors, anesthesiologists, midwives, and nurse practitioners, along with the Joint Commission, American Hospital Association, and many others. This group’s “Three Bundles, Three Years” initiative is aimed at improving birth outcomes in every birthing location in the US by tackling the three of the most common complications we see in labor and delivery:

  • Hemorrhage: Every center will have a guideline in place so that we respond effectively when a hemorrhage occurs.
  • Hypertension: Every center will implement the hypertension guidelines outlined recently by ACOG’s Task Force Report on Hypertension in Pregnancy.
  • Blood clots: Every center will focus on reducing the risks of clotting complications, such as pulmonary embolism.

At the SMFM meeting, Dr. George Saade brought together experts to address “Pregnancy as a Window to Women’s Health,” a day-long symposium co-hosted by SMFM, ACOG, and NICHD. We can predict a woman’s risk for later health problems—notably diabetes and hypertension—by evaluating her pregnancy complications or disease processes. Out of this collaborative symposium will eventually come recommendations for care and guidance for future research.

I have already started discussing with my patients at their first prenatal visit how their pregnancy will be a “window to future health.” Afterall, the patient-provider relationship is one of the most important collaborations in our careers.

 

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