A Rewarding Journey as ACOG’s President

When I started my term as ACOG’s 67th president last May, I wanted to make a difference in the lives of our members and patients, ensure ACOG’s continued growth, and lift our voice as the leading specialty organization in the nation. In many ways, what we have accomplished in 12 short months has far surpassed my expectations given the complexity of the issues we’ve had to deal with and the extraordinary circumstances we’ve had to navigate and overcome. So, in my last month, I’d like to revisit some of the things that have made this such an impactful year and taken me around the globe.

When I initially laid out my priorities for advocacy and global women’s health, there was no way to know the challenges we would face to protect women’s continued access to reproductive and maternal health care, both domestically and abroad. As my tenure progressed and new challenges presented themselves, increased member engagement became even more essential. So, we leveraged my All-in for Advocacy campaign, an effort to amplify and expand our voice with state and federal policy makers through our member stakeholders. In 2016 and 2017, I traveled throughout the country doing presentations at Grand Rounds and participating in state lobby days and was wowed by the energy and eagerness of our advocates to make positive changes in their home states.  Physicians led efforts to support our patients and our practices, successfully advancing legislation from maternal mortality to Zika and defeating legislation affecting the sacred patient-physician relationship and restricting reproductive health rights.

Also, because of ACOG’s excellent government relations team, we launched the State Legislative Action Center, where ob-gyns are able to learn more about their legislature and elected officials, search active legislation, and find opportunities to take action. And this certainly was the year for action! Ob-gyns had an important voice in the discussions on health care reform and urged policy makers not to turn back the clock on women’s health by repealing the Affordable Care Act. We fought for our patients to have continued access to affordable insurance coverage, comprehensive maternity care, no-cost preventive services such as contraceptives, and consumer protections that would prohibit insurers from denying coverage based on pre-existing conditions or setting annual or lifetime benefit caps. And while the fight is not over, the defeat of the American Health Care Act this past March is evidence that we made a tremendous impact.

We have also made great strides in ACOG’s efforts overseas. Through my own personal work to advance health care in struggling countries, I learned that we as ob-gyns can make a difference in global women’s health by sharing our knowledge and resources. However, extended time away from one’s practice is always very difficult and, for some, next to impossible. One of my goals was to make short-term projects easily accessible and identifiable for ACOG members and I am proud to say that we developed a database of non-profit organizations involved in two-week mission work that allows ob-gyns to get more information and sign up.

We’ve also grown the Alliance for Innovation in Maternal Health (AIM), which creates instructional and educational portfolios, or “safety bundles,” to fight high rates of maternal mortality in the United States. Through the hard work of ACOG’s Office of Global Women’s Health, the AIM safety bundle for postpartum hemorrhage has been instituted into practice in a low resource setting in Malawi at a community health clinic and referral hospital.  And it has meant so much to me to see the progress made and the lives saved because of this initiative. Additionally, ACOG helps educate and train local health providers in underdeveloped countries in various areas of obstetrics and gynecology through several programs, including Health Volunteers Overseas. I’m particularly proud of this work because I firmly believe that the same high standards we have for health care in the United States are the same standards that should apply to other developing countries around the world.

Lastly, another one of my goals this past year was to continue efforts to address the workforce and practice pattern changes we’ve seen in our specialty by improving ob-gyn resident education models. In 2016, the Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology Education Committee embarked on a complete overhaul of the learning objectives for residents. This effort resulted in the release of the Educational Objectives: Core Curriculum in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 11th edition. We are now surveying mid-career practicing ob-gyns to determine which of the core objectives they actually apply in their practices. Although this was an issue without an easy solution, we must continue to work together and discover ways to improve. And I truly appreciate all the hard work of ACOG’s education staff in helping to facilitate this endeavor.

As I pen my last blog, I feel that my time from president-elect nominee to president has been an incredibly rewarding journey that has literally spanned 400,000 miles, according to my frequent flier program. From trips to the nation’s capital to residencies across the country to small community health centers in Africa, each experience taught me so much and it was a great honor to be able to serve ACOG’s members in the process. If I had to impart any advice to ACOG’s incoming president, Dr. Haywood Brown, it would be to enjoy it because it will fly by. (No pun intended.) Enjoy the year, enjoy the people, and listen to their stories. Everyone has a story!

Four Ways ACOG Has Impacted Global Women’s Health in Just the Past Year

In 1994, my wife and I arrived for our first two-week mission in the Dominican Republic and were stunned by the line of people waiting outside of the hospital for us. Since medical school more than a decade earlier, we had dreamed of participating in mission projects around the world to help women in dire need of basic medical care. But then my wife began her career as a nurse, we started our family, and after residency I went into private practice. So, that goal went by the wayside. However, our trip to the Dominican Republic quickly reignited our hopes of providing necessary ob-gyn services in low resource settings. Living in the United States, it’s easy to forget that many countries around the world are battling poverty and disease and don’t have the same infrastructure and safety nets we do. After that first trip, I came home to a fully equipped operating room with the proper tools and lights that worked, my wife didn’t have to hold a flashlight during surgery because the power was out. We had carpeting and hot water at home. From that point on, my eyes were opened.

Since that first trip, I’ve continued to travel and offer my services to advance health care in struggling countries. This work has taught me that we can really make a difference in global women’s health by sharing our knowledge and resources as ob-gyns. As my presidential term at ACOG comes to a close, it is an appropriate time to reflect on what we have accomplished from my six-point plan, developed over a year ago, to help improve the health of women and children worldwide, with a focus on training and providing health care around the world.

The first step was to make these kinds of missions more easily identified and attainable. While it’s often not realistic to leave your practice for months; two weeks is doable. That’s why we developed a listing or database of non-profit organizations involved in two-week mission work in which some of our members had participated. Now on the ACOG website there is a global health resource center. ACOG members can discover more information about each organization, check these organizations’ calendars for potential projects, talk with ACOG fellows and junior fellows who have done projects, and sign up. And we must continue to get the word out so more members use and add to the database.

In partnership with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, we’ve also formed and grown the Alliance for Innovation in Maternal Health (AIM), which creates instructional and educational portfolios, or “safety bundles,” to fight high rates of maternal mortality in the United States and now Malawi. Women living in rural areas of Malawi give birth at community health centers that can’t perform operative vaginal deliveries or C-sections. When these situations arise or other complications occur, women are transferred to the central hospital in the city, most often without any attempts at stabilization prior to transport. They are often in poor condition when they arrive, which results in many otherwise preventable maternal deaths. The AIM postpartum hemorrhage bundle has been instituted into practice at both the community health clinic and referral hospital. To date, more than 130 local people have participated in vital simulations to help these patients. And while we do not have formal data on the program yet, we know that several women have received life-saving care because the teams were able to communicate and execute care in a way that they didn’t before. We anticipate many more successes that will hopefully mirror the kinds of gains we have seen here in the United States.

In addition, last year ACOG partnered with Health Volunteers Overseas, a nonprofit group that helps educate and train local health providers in underdeveloped countries in various areas of obstetrics and gynecology. It begins with local providers telling us what they need and then we come up with a plan and work together to make it happen. As of today, we have completed four site assessments and will begin offering global service opportunities for fellows in the four countries by May 2017.

Lastly, in Ethiopia, we received a five-year grant to develop a plan in partnership with the Ethiopian Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to strengthen their ob-gyn residency training programs and curriculum, improve continuing medical education, support the publishing and accessibility of clinical outcomes research, and develop an ob-gyn examination and certification program. Since its inception, the program has made great strides by working “shoulder-to-shoulder” with the Ethiopians. As a result of this program, there is now interest from other African countries to begin the same program.

The bottom line is, many women around the world are lacking access to quality, evidence-based health care and they are paying the price with their lives. As ob-gyns, we have the power to prevent this by using our skills to help reduce global maternal morbidity and mortality, as well as improved quality of life. These programs are a prime example of how we can achieve that by dedicating some of our time and effort to a cause that is greater than ourselves. While we’ve accomplished a lot, we still have much to do. So, even if you aren’t sure you have the time, consider any way you can contribute. Believe me, it will make a difference.

“AIM”ing to Reduce U.S. Maternal Mortality

During the past several weeks, you would be hard-pressed not to find an article about the dismal maternal mortality rates in this country. In fact, it was a study published in our very own Green Journal that sparked the latest national conversation (with Texas at the epicenter) about why the most modern, industrialized country in the world is failing so miserably at reducing the numbers of deaths associated with pregnancy and childbirth. However, the truth of the matter is, we already know why.

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World Contraception Day

world-contraception-day

Today, September 26th, is World Contraception Day (WCD). Now in its ninth year, WCD envisions a world where every pregnancy is wanted and women are empowered with the resources and knowledge to make informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health. Part of the larger Family Planning 2020 mission, WCD takes a multi-faceted approach to women’s health, encouraging increased sexual education, improved access to health care services, and eliminating challenges to cultural taboos based on myth or misconception.

As women’s health care providers, this mission aligns with our everyday efforts.  We counsel and educate our patients, helping their personal and professional goals align with their sexual and reproductive choices. Empowering women with choice and control over their contraceptive choices and family planning leads to happy and healthy individuals and families. Continue reading

Act Globally

Working in the field of global health has been a passion of mine since my wife, Melanie, and I served on a medical mission in the Dominican Republic many years ago. I saw first-hand the need to increase the quality of health care provided to women in other countries. All women require access to quality health care no matter where they live, and training and educating health workers is key to ensuring that care is available.

Mothers with babies in Vietnam by Sandy DoThe World Health Organization reports that almost all (99 percent) of the nearly 300,000 maternal deaths every year occur in developing countries. Two of the most common cancers affecting women – breast and cervical cancers – are of growing global concern. These alarming statistics are what make our partnership with Health Volunteer Overseas (HVO) so important. For nearly 30 years, HVO has empowered health care professionals in resource-scarce countries with knowledge and skills to address the health care needs of their communities.

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“The greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more.”

Tom Gellhaus, MD ACOG's 67th President

Tom Gellhaus, MD
ACOG’s 67th President

“The greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more.” ~Jonas Salk

This past Tuesday I was awarded a great opportunity to do more: I became ACOG’s 67th President. As the nation’s leading group of physicians providing health care for women, we have an unprecedented opportunity to do more and be empowered to make a difference in health care.

When I began my presidency, I ventured that we can make a difference in the next generation of health care through three main initiatives: global health, advocacy and new resident education models.

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Call to Action for an International Day for Maternal Health and Rights

Vineeta Gupta MD, JD, LL.M Technical Director, Global Women's Health American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Vineeta Gupta MD, JD, LL.M
Technical Director, Global Women’s Health
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

A woman dies from pregnancy or childbirth every two minutes. Almost all of these deaths (99%) are in developing countries. The most heartbreaking part is that the vast majority of these deaths are preventable.

As the nation’s leading group of physicians providing health care for women, ACOG strongly advocates for quality health care for women – everywhere.

That’s why, in an effort to demonstrate the urgency of global action to protect maternal health and rights, ACOG recognizes today as the International Day for Maternal Health and Rights.

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This International Women’s Day Take the Pledge for Equality

March 8, 2016 marks International Women’s Day and as obstetrician-gynecologist we are dedicated to quality care of women throughout their lives. We know that gender-equality is a great issue for women here in the U.S. and around the world.

As women’s health care providers, we know many of the things that help women to achieve parity. One, of course, is reproductive autonomy. The ability to control if and when to become pregnant helps women to finish their educations, progress in their careers, and pursue their life goals. This cannot be emphasized enough, but unfortunately, millions of women around the world lack reproductive control.

The theme for the 2016 International Women’s Day is #PledgeforParity. I view this theme as making two important statements: one is that women, despite gains, still do not enjoy the equality that they deserve. The other is that we all must actively take a stand, and we can do so by signing the pledge and by joining the discussion on social media.

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Guest Blog: Lady Ganga and the Fight to End Women’s Cancers

Larry Maxwell, MD, FACOG, COL(ret) U.S. Army, Director of the Globe-athon to End Women’s Cancers

Global statistics from the International Agency for Research on Cancer indicate that in 2012, gynecologic cancers accounted for 16% of the 6.6 million estimated new cases and 14% of the 3.5 million cancer related deaths among women. That means that 1 million women will be diagnosed this year with cancers below the belt and a woman will lose her battle with this disease almost every minute of every day. Cervical cancer accounted for 527,000 new cases and for 239,000 deaths. Although cervical cancer is the fourth-leading cause of cancer related death across the globe, it is the number one cause of cancer related deaths in some parts of Africa. Prevention of cervical cancer with the HPV vaccine is one of the best strategies to address the increasing problem of cervical cancer, particularly for low income countries. Unfortunately, only one third of eligible girls have received all 3 doses of the HPV vaccine in the U.S. This lack of compliance is increased among underserved groups such as African Americans. Public mistrust of the HPV vaccine has been fueled by information that is often misleading. The Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System, a national database maintained by the CDC, has analyzed severe events and not found any causative relationships. In order to optimize public opinion and enhance compliance, it’s important to clarify additional misperceptions about the safety of the vaccine.

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ACOG’s Executive Board is Working for You

In my role as ACOG President, I have the opportunity to work with many talented and dedicated people who serve on the Executive Board. The Board consists of national officers, district chairs, members at large, subspecialty representatives, and a public member. Our purpose is to carry out the objectives of ACOG by conducting the general management of the organization.

The recent meeting on July 12-14 was particularly productive. Continue reading