“AIM”ing to Reduce U.S. Maternal Mortality

During the past several weeks, you would be hard-pressed not to find an article about the dismal maternal mortality rates in this country. In fact, it was a study published in our very own Green Journal that sparked the latest national conversation (with Texas at the epicenter) about why the most modern, industrialized country in the world is failing so miserably at reducing the numbers of deaths associated with pregnancy and childbirth. However, the truth of the matter is, we already know why.

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World Contraception Day

world-contraception-day

Today, September 26th, is World Contraception Day (WCD). Now in its ninth year, WCD envisions a world where every pregnancy is wanted and women are empowered with the resources and knowledge to make informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health. Part of the larger Family Planning 2020 mission, WCD takes a multi-faceted approach to women’s health, encouraging increased sexual education, improved access to health care services, and eliminating challenges to cultural taboos based on myth or misconception.

As women’s health care providers, this mission aligns with our everyday efforts.  We counsel and educate our patients, helping their personal and professional goals align with their sexual and reproductive choices. Empowering women with choice and control over their contraceptive choices and family planning leads to happy and healthy individuals and families. Continue reading

Act Globally

Working in the field of global health has been a passion of mine since my wife, Melanie, and I served on a medical mission in the Dominican Republic many years ago. I saw first-hand the need to increase the quality of health care provided to women in other countries. All women require access to quality health care no matter where they live, and training and educating health workers is key to ensuring that care is available.

Mothers with babies in Vietnam by Sandy DoThe World Health Organization reports that almost all (99 percent) of the nearly 300,000 maternal deaths every year occur in developing countries. Two of the most common cancers affecting women – breast and cervical cancers – are of growing global concern. These alarming statistics are what make our partnership with Health Volunteer Overseas (HVO) so important. For nearly 30 years, HVO has empowered health care professionals in resource-scarce countries with knowledge and skills to address the health care needs of their communities.

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“The greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more.”

Tom Gellhaus, MD ACOG's 67th President

Tom Gellhaus, MD
ACOG’s 67th President

“The greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more.” ~Jonas Salk

This past Tuesday I was awarded a great opportunity to do more: I became ACOG’s 67th President. As the nation’s leading group of physicians providing health care for women, we have an unprecedented opportunity to do more and be empowered to make a difference in health care.

When I began my presidency, I ventured that we can make a difference in the next generation of health care through three main initiatives: global health, advocacy and new resident education models.

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Call to Action for an International Day for Maternal Health and Rights

Vineeta Gupta MD, JD, LL.M Technical Director, Global Women's Health American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Vineeta Gupta MD, JD, LL.M
Technical Director, Global Women’s Health
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

A woman dies from pregnancy or childbirth every two minutes. Almost all of these deaths (99%) are in developing countries. The most heartbreaking part is that the vast majority of these deaths are preventable.

As the nation’s leading group of physicians providing health care for women, ACOG strongly advocates for quality health care for women – everywhere.

That’s why, in an effort to demonstrate the urgency of global action to protect maternal health and rights, ACOG recognizes today as the International Day for Maternal Health and Rights.

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This International Women’s Day Take the Pledge for Equality

March 8, 2016 marks International Women’s Day and as obstetrician-gynecologist we are dedicated to quality care of women throughout their lives. We know that gender-equality is a great issue for women here in the U.S. and around the world.

As women’s health care providers, we know many of the things that help women to achieve parity. One, of course, is reproductive autonomy. The ability to control if and when to become pregnant helps women to finish their educations, progress in their careers, and pursue their life goals. This cannot be emphasized enough, but unfortunately, millions of women around the world lack reproductive control.

The theme for the 2016 International Women’s Day is #PledgeforParity. I view this theme as making two important statements: one is that women, despite gains, still do not enjoy the equality that they deserve. The other is that we all must actively take a stand, and we can do so by signing the pledge and by joining the discussion on social media.

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Guest Blog: Lady Ganga and the Fight to End Women’s Cancers

Larry Maxwell, MD, FACOG, COL(ret) U.S. Army, Director of the Globe-athon to End Women’s Cancers

Global statistics from the International Agency for Research on Cancer indicate that in 2012, gynecologic cancers accounted for 16% of the 6.6 million estimated new cases and 14% of the 3.5 million cancer related deaths among women. That means that 1 million women will be diagnosed this year with cancers below the belt and a woman will lose her battle with this disease almost every minute of every day. Cervical cancer accounted for 527,000 new cases and for 239,000 deaths. Although cervical cancer is the fourth-leading cause of cancer related death across the globe, it is the number one cause of cancer related deaths in some parts of Africa. Prevention of cervical cancer with the HPV vaccine is one of the best strategies to address the increasing problem of cervical cancer, particularly for low income countries. Unfortunately, only one third of eligible girls have received all 3 doses of the HPV vaccine in the U.S. This lack of compliance is increased among underserved groups such as African Americans. Public mistrust of the HPV vaccine has been fueled by information that is often misleading. The Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System, a national database maintained by the CDC, has analyzed severe events and not found any causative relationships. In order to optimize public opinion and enhance compliance, it’s important to clarify additional misperceptions about the safety of the vaccine.

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ACOG’s Executive Board is Working for You

In my role as ACOG President, I have the opportunity to work with many talented and dedicated people who serve on the Executive Board. The Board consists of national officers, district chairs, members at large, subspecialty representatives, and a public member. Our purpose is to carry out the objectives of ACOG by conducting the general management of the organization.

The recent meeting on July 12-14 was particularly productive. Continue reading

ACOG as a World Partner in Women’s Health

I am proud of what ACOG is doing in so many areas of women’s health, but I have particular pride in our global health initiatives. On June 13-14, I participated with a very dedicated group of ACOG Fellows in the Global Operations Advisory Group meeting to develop a strategic plan for our global operations. For two rewarding days, we created plans to help extend ACOG’s contributions to our ob-gyn colleagues in other countries and the women in those countries who are so in need of improvements in health care.

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Every Woman, Every Time – In Chicago and Beyond

ACOG’s Annual Clinical Meeting in Chicago is just over a week away. I’d like to tell you about the three fabulous speakers that I selected for my President’s Program. I know that each of them will bring alive the spirit of my presidential theme, “Every Woman, Every Time.”

First up will be Dr. Lesley Regan who leads global women’s health efforts for the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists in London. She also chairs the Committee for Sexual and Reproductive Rights for the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. In “Human Rights and Women’s Health in the 21st Century,” Dr. Regan will address every woman’s basic rights to health care, as well as the challenges that different cultures around the globe face in providing this care.

Our second lecturer is Dr. Mark Hanson, director of the Academic Unit of Human Development and Health at the University of Southhampton in the United Kingdom. Dr. Hanson has focused his work on new ways to reduce disease processes and improve health by championing preventive interventions during preconception, throughout pregnancy, and in infancy and childhood. In his lecture, “The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Challenge,” he’ll provide his insight into why investing in the health of our current generation is the best way to invest in the health of future generations.

The final speaker will be the distinguished Dr. Tyrone Hayes, professor of biology at the University of California–Berkeley. In “From Silent Spring to Silent Night: The Impact of the Environment on Reproductive Health,” Dr. Hayes will illustrate why we must study the impact of environmental chemicals on our health. As I have said many times, and as Dr. Hayes will demonstrate, ob-gyns need to lead efforts to shift the burden of proof away from physicians and the public back to the chemical industry. Companies must prove that chemicals are safe before they are released into the environment and the marketplace.

This year’s annual meeting promises to have something for everyone—great lectures, wonderful camaraderie with colleagues, and an opportunity for all of us to celebrate our wonderful careers in obstetrics-gynecology. See you in Chicago.