What is the next generation of healthcare?

As ACOG President, I feel a great responsibility to help our members and our specialty lead and evolve in these changing and often challenging times. To do so, we must focus on building a strong foundation upon the rigorous standards of excellence that guide us every day. One of the things I most enjoy about membership in ACOG is the community. With a central goal at hand, superior care for women and families, we come together to learn from, support, and develop alongside our peers. As we face more constant, direct, and often negative forces beyond our exam rooms, our community has another imperative: advocacy.

By cultivating the knowledge and capability of our existing and newest members, we ensure the future of our profession and the patients we serve. In part, this requires legislative and political advocacy by all of our Fellows and Junior Fellows. We must lend the diversity and depth of our community’s knowledge and expertise to help reach safe and sustainable outcomes on issues regarding women’s healthcare.

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“The greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more.”

Tom Gellhaus, MD ACOG's 67th President

Tom Gellhaus, MD
ACOG’s 67th President

“The greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more.” ~Jonas Salk

This past Tuesday I was awarded a great opportunity to do more: I became ACOG’s 67th President. As the nation’s leading group of physicians providing health care for women, we have an unprecedented opportunity to do more and be empowered to make a difference in health care.

When I began my presidency, I ventured that we can make a difference in the next generation of health care through three main initiatives: global health, advocacy and new resident education models.

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This International Women’s Day Take the Pledge for Equality

March 8, 2016 marks International Women’s Day and as obstetrician-gynecologist we are dedicated to quality care of women throughout their lives. We know that gender-equality is a great issue for women here in the U.S. and around the world.

As women’s health care providers, we know many of the things that help women to achieve parity. One, of course, is reproductive autonomy. The ability to control if and when to become pregnant helps women to finish their educations, progress in their careers, and pursue their life goals. This cannot be emphasized enough, but unfortunately, millions of women around the world lack reproductive control.

The theme for the 2016 International Women’s Day is #PledgeforParity. I view this theme as making two important statements: one is that women, despite gains, still do not enjoy the equality that they deserve. The other is that we all must actively take a stand, and we can do so by signing the pledge and by joining the discussion on social media.

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What APHA’s New Standards Mean to Ob-Gyns

Earlier this month at its Annual Meeting and Exposition, the American Public Health Association (APHA) adopted 18 new policy statements ranging from contraception access to preventing prescription painkiller abuse. Although they go beyond the Pap test and pelvic exam, many of the new standards are directly related to ob-gyns as population health is closely linked to our specialty. It’s important for us to pay attention to these related issues so, I’d like to take a moment to review a few of them here. Please note that these are only some of the women’s health focused policy positions.

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Get More from Your ACOG Membership

Earlier this month I received an email announcing the ACOG application for Committee service and I got to thinking about all of the exciting and different ways members can get involved with our organization. I also started to reminisce about my start with ACOG as a member of the Connecticut Section Advisory Council, many years ago. About the same time, I attended several Congressional Leadership Conferences and began to get a feel for the value of ACOG as the only organization that really represents ob-gyns across the country, as well as the patients we serve. That was in the late 1980’s, which started me down the path of holding various ACOG leadership positions; about 10 years later, I became section chair and a member of the District I Advisory Council, ultimately leading to the District I chair role in 2006.

Every step of the way, I had the opportunity to meet some amazing people from an ever-increasing geographical radius. As District I chair, I served with the other District chairs on ACOG’s Executive Board. At the national level, it works in many ways like it does at the section level. There is work to do, and if you want to be involved, you raise your hand and volunteer. ACOG has been a great way to give something back to the specialty that I love and the profession that I chose as my life’s work.  So I continued to volunteer, worked on various committees, task forces and work groups from time to time, and became more involved than ever. I had the honor of being chosen for the office of secretary, my first national office, and served in that role for three years, learning more about ACOG, and myself. The rest is history as they say: before I knew it, I was President!

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ACOG: Our Strength Is in Our Members

Serving as ACOG President is indeed an honor. It is also a significant responsibility involving accountability to the 58,000 members who pay dues to our organization. We are the premier organization advocating for obstetrics and gynecology and women’s health care. As ACOG members, we are above all things dedicated to striving for and preserving our reputation of excellence, our credibility and our integrity in the pursuit of the best in women’s health care delivery.

This has been an interesting and exciting year for me to say the very least. The meetings, the travel, the interactions with other medical societies, and advocacy efforts were all expected. Yes, there have been challenges, conflicts, resolutions, and clearly, many positive accomplishments. However, I did not expect that almost every waking hour would include some activity related to ACOG.

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ACOG’s Executive Board is Working for You

In my role as ACOG President, I have the opportunity to work with many talented and dedicated people who serve on the Executive Board. The Board consists of national officers, district chairs, members at large, subspecialty representatives, and a public member. Our purpose is to carry out the objectives of ACOG by conducting the general management of the organization.

The recent meeting on July 12-14 was particularly productive. Continue reading

ACOG Fellow Dr. Robert M. Wah Becomes Leader of AMA

Robert Wah and John Jennings

Dr. Wah and Dr. Jennings posed for a picture just before Dr. Wah’s inauguration ceremony.

I recently returned from Chicago, where I attended the 2014 American Medical Association Annual Meeting from June 6-11. It was a busy meeting! ACOG and the AMA have a long history of productive collaboration. This year, with the inauguration of ACOG Fellow Dr. Robert M. Wah as AMA President, our mutual relationship can only grow stronger.

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Every Woman, Every Time – In Chicago and Beyond

ACOG’s Annual Clinical Meeting in Chicago is just over a week away. I’d like to tell you about the three fabulous speakers that I selected for my President’s Program. I know that each of them will bring alive the spirit of my presidential theme, “Every Woman, Every Time.”

First up will be Dr. Lesley Regan who leads global women’s health efforts for the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists in London. She also chairs the Committee for Sexual and Reproductive Rights for the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. In “Human Rights and Women’s Health in the 21st Century,” Dr. Regan will address every woman’s basic rights to health care, as well as the challenges that different cultures around the globe face in providing this care.

Our second lecturer is Dr. Mark Hanson, director of the Academic Unit of Human Development and Health at the University of Southhampton in the United Kingdom. Dr. Hanson has focused his work on new ways to reduce disease processes and improve health by championing preventive interventions during preconception, throughout pregnancy, and in infancy and childhood. In his lecture, “The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Challenge,” he’ll provide his insight into why investing in the health of our current generation is the best way to invest in the health of future generations.

The final speaker will be the distinguished Dr. Tyrone Hayes, professor of biology at the University of California–Berkeley. In “From Silent Spring to Silent Night: The Impact of the Environment on Reproductive Health,” Dr. Hayes will illustrate why we must study the impact of environmental chemicals on our health. As I have said many times, and as Dr. Hayes will demonstrate, ob-gyns need to lead efforts to shift the burden of proof away from physicians and the public back to the chemical industry. Companies must prove that chemicals are safe before they are released into the environment and the marketplace.

This year’s annual meeting promises to have something for everyone—great lectures, wonderful camaraderie with colleagues, and an opportunity for all of us to celebrate our wonderful careers in obstetrics-gynecology. See you in Chicago.

A Week of Thanks, A Year of Thanks, A Life of Thanks…

We have some special holidays in the United States, and Thanksgiving is one of my favorites. I know I should give thanks for a wonderful life every day, but sometimes I don’t take the time. So let me take a moment now to share some of the many things for which I’m grateful.

As ACOG President, I am thankful for the Fellowship of physicians who devote their lives to women’s health by providing exceptional care and by sacrificing their personal lives for their patients’ care. We are a profession of givers. We are there to hold the hand of a patient with a life-threatening illness and to hand a newborn into the arms of a loving family. We teach and mentor, we laugh and cry—with friends, colleagues, and our patients.

I am thankful for the past six months in my role as ACOG President. I have been given the enormous opportunity to represent our Fellows before Congress, across the country at our regional meetings, and with our colleagues from around the world. This week ACOG hosted the leaders from the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and the United Kingdom’s Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). We discussed our shared goals and promised to do much more together.

As one can only imagine, we all face many of the same dilemmas. Even in health care systems as diverse as the US fee-for-service environment to the United Kingdom’s National Health Service, we appreciate the common threads. Each of our organizations is developing systems to provide ob-gyns with the best guidance for delivering health care. Each of us is deliberating changes in our workforce, and we are devoted to improving patient care within our own country and abroad. We can do so much more as we collaborate.

So this week I give thanks to the wonderful organizations of ACOG, SOGC, and RCOG, and their great leaders. And I’m thankful for each of you, our Fellows, my blog readers. What are you thankful for?

Wishing each of you a Happy Thanksgiving.