The ACA and OTC Medications – What Physicians Need to Know About Changes in Coverage

January 1 has come and gone, but many of us are unaware of some of the changes with the Affordable Care Act, particularly related to coverage of medications and supplements that became effective in 2014. For our patients who are enrolled in ACA-compliant plans, certain over-the-counter (OTC) medications are now covered at no cost when written as a prescription. Translation: Write prescriptions for these medications when medically necessary.

As an example, aspirin is now a covered medication under the ACA for women ages 55–79 when the benefit of reducing heart attacks outweighs the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. The cost of OTC emergency contraception is also covered if a prescription is written for it. Vitamin D supplements are covered for women ages 65 and older to prevent fractures. And folic acid supplements are covered for women capable of becoming pregnant.

This change in insurance coverage comes at a time when research is looking closely at the benefits of supplements. Certainly all of us are confused at times when related research appears in the media and the benefits of vitamins and supplements are questioned. That’s why we as physicians need to make recommendations to our patients based on their individual needs. This ensures that reproductive-age women don’t forgo important and proven supplements—for instance, folic acid to reduce birth defects like spina bifida—based on a single study.

As physicians, we are in a position to not only recommend, but to reinforce the use of these medications and vitamin supplements for preventive health. It’s up to us health care providers to recommend and prescribe them.

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A Vitamin for Healthy Moms and Babies

Pop Quiz: What vitamin is associated with a 50–70% reduction in birth defects? Answer: Folic Acid

I recently wrote about the importance of eating your vitamins through food, but getting enough folic acid from natural sources can be tough. Folic acid is an essential B vitamin necessary for proper cell growth. It’s vital to the development of a baby’s brain, spinal cord, and central nervous system and integral in preventing birth defects such as spina bifida, anencephaly, and cleft lip and palate. Here’s the catch: In order for folic acid to provide the best protection against birth defects, levels of the vitamin need to be high in a woman’s body before she becomes pregnant and through the first three months of pregnancy.

Because nearly half of the pregnancies in the US are unintended, it’s important that reproductive-age women build up their folic acid stores, whether planning a pregnancy or not. ACOG recommends that all childbearing-age women take 400 micrograms of folic acid each day. Women who have had a child with a neural tube defect or certain other birth defects, are pregnant with twins, have particular medical conditions (such as sickle cell disease), or take some forms of medication (such as antiseizure medication) may need more.

Our bodies can’t process folate—the naturally occurring form of folic acid found in leafy green vegetables, citrus fruits, and beans—as easily as the man-made form. Folic acid-enriched breakfast cereals, breads, flours, pastas, rice, and other grains can help, but even women who eat diets high in these sources may not get enough. To make sure you get the recommended amount, take a daily supplement or multivitamin containing 0.4 milligrams or 400 micrograms of folic acid.