ACOG and ACA: Investing in Women’s Health

As many of you know, I started my ACOG presidency announcing 2013 as “The Year of the Woman” because for the first time we, as a nation, are investing in women’s health care with the Affordable Care Act. It is an investment in our future when we provide all women with preconception care, prenatal care, and contraception.

I spent last week in Washington, DC, discussing the impact of environmental chemicals on our reproductive health with our elected officials. And what a week it was! I saw firsthand the dedication of the furloughed employees who were trying to help everyone. I heard the frustration of many DC residents as they faced reduced work hours and uncertainty about what the next day or week will bring.

Amidst all of this chaos, the ACA’s health insurance exchanges opened for business. Yes, there are going to be some difficulties along the road with implementing health care reform, but there will be fewer of them when we work together to make health care changes a success.

I was in the hair salon recently and found out that the women working there had no health coverage. I opened my iPad and showed them how to enroll in Covered California. In no time, they logged in, found affordable benefits, and were singing its praises. These are working women who had gone without coverage because they could not afford it and their small businesses did not provide health benefits. All of these women—some young, some single moms—all shared one uncertainty: What would they do if they became sick? They had not even considered getting preventive health care.

We need our government to open for business, we need to work on our health care delivery system, and we need to remind everyone that women are finally getting what we said is essential all along: Screening for cervical and breast cancer, screening for intimate partner violence and depression, contraception coverage, and prenatal care. Worrying about not being able to afford or even get health insurance because of a pre-existing condition can now be a thing of the past. Losing your health insurance coverage during the course of a difficult disease when you need it the most can also be a worry of the past. What a wonderful year!

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Guest Blog: Every Reproductive-Age Woman At Risk, Every Time

Frances Casey, MD

Frances Casey, MD

Full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will remove many of the financial barriers women face to obtain effective methods of contraception. While making contraception affordable for every woman is a good first step toward improved prevention of unintended pregnancies, it remains the responsibility of health care providers to counsel women about all methods of contraception and help them find the one that may be the most effective.

The CHOICE project demonstrated that removing financial barriers related to the most effective methods of contraception decreases rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion. But the CHOICE project also did something many of us ob-gyns do not. Every reproductive-age woman eligible for the study was read a script about the effectiveness of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), such as intrauterine devices (IUD) and hormonal implants.Instead of discussing LARC with their patients, many providers continue recommending less effective contraceptive methods based on misconceptions that adolescents, women who have never been pregnant, or women they estimate are at high risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are not good candidates for LARCs. However, according to ACOG, LARC is the most effective form of contraception available and safe for use in all of these groups.

Because LARCs don’t require ongoing effort by the user, continuation and correct usage rates are higher. This could significantly reduce unintended pregnancy among teens and women if widely adopted. Additionally, women at high risk of both STIs and unintended pregnancy can be screened, obtain a LARC method the same day, and receive treatment without removing the device. Women with medical conditions and physical and mental disabilities can also benefit from both the pregnancy prevention and the non-contraceptive benefits of LARC.

Other women may also benefit from a longer-acting option. Without strict breastfeeding, postpartum moms are at risk for ovulation and repeat pregnancies even earlier than six weeks after delivery. LARC methods can be inserted immediately following delivery or at four weeks postpartum. Despite slightly higher expulsion rates, the benefits of immediate postpartum insertion of LARC methods may outweigh risks for women who are unlikely to receive postpartum care.

Minimizing financial barriers will make contraceptive methods more accessible for women at risk of unintended pregnancies, but it is up to us, as their partners in prevention, to counsel them on the most effective methods, including LARCs, at every opportunity.

Frances Casey, MD, is a Family Planning Fellow at Washington Hospital Center in DC.

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Guest Blog: The Co-Pay Question—Contraceptive Access Under the ACA

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Barbara S. Levy, MD

If you’ve been to the pharmacy or doctor’s office lately, there’s a good chance that you noticed something different about your bill—there may not have been one. Depending on what type of insurance you have, you may now be eligible to receive all FDA-approved contraception and other preventive health services without a co-pay. This is due to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a law with a lofty goal: overhauling our current health care system to provide the majority of Americans with affordable access to health care. While the intricacies of the ACA—and health insurance policies—are complex, it’s important for women to understand these most recent changes because they so specifically apply to us.

Whether or not you still have a co-pay for contraceptives depends on where you get your health insurance. More than half of people in the US get their insurance either through their job or by purchasing an individual insurance plan. Currently, the contraceptive coverage provision applies to most of these private plans. Insurance companies that adopted ACA policy changes early on may have already updated their plans to offer free contraception beginning in August 2012. As time passes, more plans will comply. However, there are some exceptions—some plans have grandfathered status that gives them more time to meet the terms of the new requirements, and some religiously affiliated organizations are currently exempt from providing this coverage.

State Medicaid programs already provide no-cost contraception to enrollees. The ACA expands Medicaid’s reach, potentially decreasing the number of uninsured women ages 19–64 from 20% to 8%. Many states are still hammering out exactly how Medicaid provisions will be implemented. ACOG is following this issue closely and supports the adoption of the ACA’s Medicaid expansion in all states.

So how can you find out whether your plan has changed and what new services are covered? You’ll need to ask a few questions and then update your records to be sure your health care team (you, your insurer, pharmacy, and your doctor) is on the same page:

  • Ask your employer or your health insurer whether the ACA has caused any significant changes to your plan. If so, what are they, and specifically, is contraception now covered without a co-pay?
  • If there are updates to your plan, be sure to notify your pharmacy and your doctor’s office and report any problems to your plan administrator or insurance company. It’s up to you to be sure you’re being charged correctly based on what your policy covers.

As an ob-gyn, I am thrilled by the increased availability of no-cost contraception that the ACA provides. Contraception is a basic health necessity for women. More access puts women in the driver’s seat, helping us avoid unintended pregnancy and take control of our reproductive health.

Learn more about contraceptive coverage and the ACA.

Barbara S. Levy, MD, is vice president of health policy at ACOG.

Guest Blog: Why Expanding Medicaid Matters for Women

Gerald F. Joseph Jr, MD

Many women in the United States do not have health insurance. As a result, they don’t get the health care they need and their health suffers. Compared to women with health insurance, uninsured women are:

* Less likely to receive preventive care or treatment for disease.

* More likely to be diagnosed with cervical and other cancers at a late stage and die from the disease or its complications due to a delay in diagnosis.

* Less likely to get prenatal care during pregnancy. The babies of uninsured women are also more likely to be born with a low birthweight and die within the first year of life.

* Less likely to use a prescription contraceptive, which can lead to unintended pregnancy.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) can help. It expands Medicaid—the state-federal health insurance program for low-income individuals—which is one of the health care reform provisions that ACOG supports. The percentage of uninsured women ages 19–64 could decrease from 20% to 8%, but this will happen only if all 50 state governors decide to expand their Medicaid programs. ACOG encourages all states to accept this expansion offer, under which the federal government will pay all the costs until 2016. After that, the federal contribution gradually drops, but only to 90% in 2020 and beyond.

The ACA also makes it easier for states to provide Medicaid birth control coverage to low-income women by eliminating bureaucratic red tape.

With Election Day approaching rapidly, I encourage you to find out what the candidates in your state support. Use your vote to make it clear to your state lawmakers that expansion of Medicaid is good for women’s health.

For more information:

Protect Medicaid and Women’s Health

What the Medicaid Eligibility Expansion Means for Women

Medicaid Expansion Resources

Gerald F. Joseph Jr, MD, is ACOG vice president for practice activities.