Vaccine Safety Facts: Overcoming the Hype

It’s National Influenza Vaccination Week, a time for ob-gyns and health professionals to encourage the annual flu vaccine for everyone 6 months and older, including pregnant women. We’ve all seen the numbers on the many millions of lives that have been saved by the flu vaccine and other vaccinations. Vaccines have been a major public health triumph. In fact, they have been so successful that the average American has fortunately never personally seen a single case of polio or even measles, diseases that were commonplace and often deadly not so long ago. So getting everyone vaccinated should be easy, right?

Yet, we sometimes encounter resistance from our patients who may have heard myths and inaccuracies about vaccines. That’s especially true when vaccine safety has been in the news, as it’s been over the past few weeks, this time related to the HPV vaccine. While this type of sensational media coverage can be frustrating, we must focus on our role as health care providers to be the experts, to dispel the myths, and to provide the facts.

How can we overcome the vaccine hype? By sharing these and other key vaccine facts with our patients, consistently and regularly:

Vaccine Facts

Fact: More than 100 million diseases have been prevented because of vaccinations in the US alone.

Fact: Vaccines are safe. Extensive research has found no link between vaccines and autism or other serious health conditions.

HPV Vaccine Facts

Fact: The HPV vaccine is safe.

Fact: The HPV vaccine is nearly 100% effective in preventing cervical cancer caused by certain HPV strains.

Flu Vaccine Facts

Fact: Getting the flu vaccine does not cause the flu.

Fact: It’s safe for pregnant women to get the flu vaccine.

As ob-gyns, we are in a unique position to educate women about the facts on vaccines. Together with our patients, we can be more effective than the hype of an uninformed or misguided spokespeople who knowingly or unknowingly undermines the value of vaccines. The overwhelming evidence is clear—vaccines are safe and effective, and we need to take every opportunity to communicate these facts to our patients.

For more information on immunizations, go to www.immunizationforwomen.org.

Subscribe to the ACOG President’s Blog to receive an email alert every time a new blog is posted.

With Routine Medical Tests and Procedures, Choose Wisely

Hal C. Lawrence III, MD, ACOG Vice President, speaking during the press briefing.

Hal C. Lawrence III, MD, ACOG Executive Vice President, speaking during the press briefing.

Open lines of communication are the basis of successful doctor-patient interactions. However, when it comes to medical tests and procedures, doctors and patients alike can easily slide into cruise control without taking the time to discuss what’s truly needed, appropriate, supported by evidence-based research, and in the best interest of the patient’s care.

With this in mind, ACOG has teamed up with the Choosing Wisely campaign—an initiative that aims to spark a conversation about commonly performed tests and exams in different areas of medicine. By taking a critical eye to routine health care practices, we can make better decisions on how to provide thorough and comprehensive care while avoiding unnecessary, redundant, or even risk-increasing procedures.

Today, at a joint press conference with 16 other partnering organizations, ACOG made the following recommendations:

1. Don’t schedule elective, non-medically indicated inductions of labor or cesarean deliveries before 39 weeks 0 days gestational age.
Delivery prior to 39 weeks 0 days has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of learning disabilities and a potential increase in morbidity and mortality. There are clear medical indications for delivery prior to 39 weeks 0 days based on maternal and/or fetal conditions. A mature fetal lung test, in the absence of appropriate clinical criteria, is not an indication for delivery.

2. Don’t schedule elective, non-medically indicated inductions of labor between 39 weeks 0 days and 41 weeks 0 days unless the cervix is deemed favorable.
Ideally, labor should start on its own initiative whenever possible. Higher cesarean delivery rates result from inductions of labor when the cervix is unfavorable. Health care practitioners should discuss the risks and benefits with their patients before considering inductions of labor without medical indications.

3. Don’t perform routine annual cervical cytology screening (Pap tests) in women 30–65 years of age.
In average–risk women, annual cervical cytology screening has been shown to offer no advantage over screening performed at 3-year intervals. However, a well-woman visit should occur annually for patients with their health care practitioner to discuss concerns and problems and to have appropriate screening with consideration of a pelvic examination.

4. Don’t treat patients who have mild dysplasia of less than two years in duration.
Mild dysplasia (Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia [CIN 1]) is associated with the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which does not require treatment in average–risk women. Most women with CIN 1 on biopsy have a transient HPV infection that will usually clear in less than 12 months and, therefore, does not require treatment.

5. Don’t screen for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women at average risk.
In population studies, there is only fair evidence that screening of asymptomatic women with serum CA-125 level and/or transvaginal ultrasound can detect ovarian cancer at an earlier stage than can be detected in the absence of screening. Because of the low prevalence of ovarian cancer and the invasive nature of the interventions required after a positive screening test, the potential harms of screening outweigh the potential benefits.

Learn more.

Guest Blog: A Changing Tide—Have New Pap Test Recommendations Taken Hold?

David Chelmow, MD

David Chelmow, MD

If you’ve been following women’s health news, you know that a lot’s changed recently with Pap screening. Over the last decade, health organizations including ACOG, the American Cancer Society (ACS), and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), have been reviewing research to determine how we can best prevent cervical cancer without excessive testing and unnecessary medical intervention.

The latest round of recommendations issued by each of these groups in 2012, building on guidance from ACOG in 2009, is generally consistent. All three organizations agree that for most women, cervical cancer screening should:

  • begin at age 21
  • stop after age 65 or following a hysterectomy in which the cervix has been removed
  • be performed every three years (Pap test only) OR every five years in women over 30 who’ve received negative results on a simultaneous Pap and human papillomavirus (HPV) test

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published two studies looking at the use of Pap testing from 2000 to 2010. Much of what they found was good news and strongly suggests that doctors and patients are increasingly following the new recommendations. Fewer women younger than 21 were tested, and there was less Pap screening of women who had hysterectomy.

Unfortunately, there was also disappointing news. Many women continued to receive unnecessary Pap tests, including more than half of women younger than 21. Given the frequency of HPV infection in this age group, these young women are at significant risk for harms of testing without any expected benefit of cancer prevention. A much better strategy for prevention in this age group is HPV vaccination, but data from other sources suggest only a small portion of eligible women are receiving the full three-shot course of the vaccine. Additionally, 60% of women age 30 and older who had a hysterectomy continued to get Pap testing over this timeframe, according to CDC. Only a few of these women will need continued testing.

The studies also found that women age 22 to 30 who have never been screened increased from 6% to 9%—disturbing data considering most cervical cancer occurs in women who have never been screened or have not been screened in more than five years. Women age 30 to 64 who did not have health insurance were also less likely to be up to date with Pap screening in 2010 than in 2000.

For women to get the best protection against cervical cancer, they should get the HPV vaccine and be screened using the Pap and HPV tests according to ACOG recommendations. Let’s hope that the 2010—2020 summary finds that more women are getting screened according to the recommendations.

David Chelmow, MD, is professor and chair of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond. Dr. Chelmow is a member of The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Practice Bulletins–Gynecology.

A Plan to Defeat HPV

In a recent blog post titled “HPV and a Vaccine: Why We Can Beat Cervical Cancer,” William Smith, executive director of the National Coalition of STD Directors, looks in depth at the conundrum of cervical cancer in the US today. On one hand, we can now classify cervical cancer as a largely preventable disease. On the other, more than 4,000 women in the US still die from cervical cancer each year. If we are to drive these numbers down, HPV vaccination must play an essential role.

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical, vulvar, vaginal, and anal cancers in women; penile and anal cancers in men; and throat, esophageal, and other head and neck cancers in both sexes. The HPV vaccine has the potential to protect young women—and men—from many, if not all, of these cancers. Recommended for girls and women ages 9–26 and boys and men ages 11–26, HPV vaccination works best if given before any exposure to HPV or the onset of sexual activity. But despite the recommendations of ACOG and other health organizations and women’s advocates, vaccination rates have remained low.

Many parents are sensitive to discussions regarding their young daughters (and sons) and sexually transmitted infections (STI). However difficult the concept, parents would be remiss in avoiding a potentially life-saving vaccine for these reasons. HPV vaccination is just another tool in a parent’s arsenal to shield their children and family from cancer. It’s no different than routinely vaccinating infants against hepatitis B—another STI that can increase the risk of liver cancer—which has been commonplace for roughly 30 years.

As a parent, some things just make good sense. And with the benefits that it provides, HPV vaccination is clearly one of those things. Protect your children; get them vaccinated.