Guest Blog: With the ACA, Many Ounces of Prevention

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Have you ever heard the phrase “an ounce of prevention = a pound of cure”? It’s an often-used mantra in the medical community and a message we continuously repeat to our patients. That’s because intervention through prevention makes good sense. In many cases, catastrophic illness can be avoided by nipping small problems in the bud or diagnosing and treating disease early. In addition to living a healthy lifestyle, regularly visiting your doctor for routine screenings and counseling is paramount to achieving this goal.

As women, we are often the primary (or sole) caregiver for our families—not to mention the cook, head nurse, and chief financial officer among many other roles. Without a second thought, we may put the needs of others before our own. This is especially true if money is tight and it’s a decision between getting an annual well-woman exam, paying $50 for a birth control prescription, or meeting the needs of a child, spouse, parent, or friend. But this philosophy doesn’t serve women well—if you’re sick, who will look after the people you care about?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA)—the new US law that expands health care coverage by making health care more affordable and accessible—focuses on expanded access to preventive services. Making preventive services available for little or no out-of-pocket cost makes it easier for women to do the right thing for their health and put themselves first. As I discussed in my last post, a growing number of women are now eligible to receive contraception and other preventive health services without a co-pay.

Preventive services that are now covered include:

  • Annual well-woman visit
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing
  • Preventive vaccinations including HPV, flu, hepatitis A & B, shingles, and chicken pox
  • Sexually transmitted disease prevention counseling
  • Obesity screening and counseling
  • Smoking cessation
  • Depression screening

The ACA chips away at many of the barriers to access and care that women have faced for years. Here at ACOG, we’re closely monitoring the implementation of the law and will continue to advocate for comprehensive care for the women we serve. I believe this legislation is a major step in the right direction to improving women’s health and improving health outcomes for all Americans.

Check out these links to learn more about ACA and how it will affect you:

Prevention, Wellness, and Comparing Providers (HealthCare.gov)

Benefits for Women and Children of New Affordable Care Act Rules on Expanding Prevention Coverage (HealthCare.gov)

Effective Date: Women’s Preventive Health Coverage Requirements (ACOG)

Barbara S. Levy, MD, is vice president of health policy at ACOG.