Every Woman, Every Time…Cada Mujer, Cada Vez

What a difference a year makes. It was only a year ago that I said 2013 was “The Year of the Woman” and asked ob-gyns around the nation to lead efforts on behalf of women’s health. We saw a rocky start to the Affordable Care Act, yet as ob-gyns we have appreciated that so much of what we value for our patients is now considered a health benefit:  cervical and breast cancer screening, preconception health, maternity care.

The challenge in front of us is to provide care, lead change efforts in our hospitals and communities, and sustain our practices. At times it is daunting. This last year, we heard your concerns and worked on your behalf to improve our care delivery, to empower safety efforts, and to challenge those who fight reproductive health access, payment reforms and medical liability reform. We have worked hard to keep legislators out of our exam rooms!

A year ago I introduced a mantra that reinforces all that we hold dear: Every Woman, Every Time. For every woman, at every encounter in our health care delivery system, we need to help her achieve optimal health and wellness in the context of reproductive choices. This year has seen uncertainty and changes in health care delivery. I challenged all of us as ACOG Fellows to take the lead, because the changes in medicine will come at a cost that requires each and every one of us to foster change and collaboration.

No longer can we sit back and let change happen. Rather, we need to direct the changes, to lead the transformation that places women first. Only if we place the focus on quality, on service and on attaining health care access for all women will our practices—and our skills—flourish. By making women our focus, we will succeed. This past year, ACOG led a well-woman task force, to achieve consistency in well-woman care across all medical providers. We have opportunities to share with colleagues in internal medicine, pediatrics and family practice, and with our partners who are nurse midwives and nurse practitioners, in all aspects of well-woman care.

It has been an honor to represent the most wonderful specialty, both here and abroad. ACOG has a strong voice—in the halls of Congress, amongst our colleagues across the US, and amongst our sister organizations around the world. We are leaders.

ACOG relies on the work of all our Fellows. I thank each and every one of you for the gift of this year, to represent women, to represent Fellows, to represent ACOG

For Every Woman, Every Time.

Finally, Women’s Health Gets Its Due

It is an amazing time for women in the US. The recent passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) shows that women’s health has been embraced as a national priority. Implementation of this landmark legislation will improve and expand health care for millions of women. From yearly well-woman visits to cancer screenings and domestic violence screening and counseling, to breastfeeding support and contraceptive coverage, more women’s health services will be accessible and affordable than ever before.

It’s with this backdrop that I take the reins as president of The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and I couldn’t be more excited. As a nation, we’re finally recognizing that health care is about more than solving accute health crises. It’s about promoting wellness to prevent disease. For ob-gyns, providing top-notch health care includes having meaningful interactions with women and providing them tools not only to maintain their physical health, but to improve their physical, mental, and emotional health, too.

Ob-gyns will be greatly affected by the new law, but we’ll also have a chance to make a great impact. We will be gaining new patients and collaborating with colleagues to optimize their health. We should strive to make the most of these patient-doctor visits and encourage women to put their health first—take advantage of the services ACA offers; get preexisting health conditions under control; make time for eating right, exercise, and the stress-relieving activities that they enjoy. These are fundamental health reminders that we must convey to every woman, every time.

As an ob-gyn, I believe that no medical specialty knows women’s health better than we do. We have a duty to speak up in the best interest of women’s health. During my year as ACOG president, I plan to take every opportunity to advocate for women. I challenge ACOG Fellows to let your voices be heard as well. Talk to your legislators and your community about women’s health, but most of all, talk to your patients. Working with them one-on-one to build the foundation for a healthier future is where we can make the biggest difference.

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Guest Blog: With the ACA, Many Ounces of Prevention

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Have you ever heard the phrase “an ounce of prevention = a pound of cure”? It’s an often-used mantra in the medical community and a message we continuously repeat to our patients. That’s because intervention through prevention makes good sense. In many cases, catastrophic illness can be avoided by nipping small problems in the bud or diagnosing and treating disease early. In addition to living a healthy lifestyle, regularly visiting your doctor for routine screenings and counseling is paramount to achieving this goal.

As women, we are often the primary (or sole) caregiver for our families—not to mention the cook, head nurse, and chief financial officer among many other roles. Without a second thought, we may put the needs of others before our own. This is especially true if money is tight and it’s a decision between getting an annual well-woman exam, paying $50 for a birth control prescription, or meeting the needs of a child, spouse, parent, or friend. But this philosophy doesn’t serve women well—if you’re sick, who will look after the people you care about?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA)—the new US law that expands health care coverage by making health care more affordable and accessible—focuses on expanded access to preventive services. Making preventive services available for little or no out-of-pocket cost makes it easier for women to do the right thing for their health and put themselves first. As I discussed in my last post, a growing number of women are now eligible to receive contraception and other preventive health services without a co-pay.

Preventive services that are now covered include:

  • Annual well-woman visit
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing
  • Preventive vaccinations including HPV, flu, hepatitis A & B, shingles, and chicken pox
  • Sexually transmitted disease prevention counseling
  • Obesity screening and counseling
  • Smoking cessation
  • Depression screening

The ACA chips away at many of the barriers to access and care that women have faced for years. Here at ACOG, we’re closely monitoring the implementation of the law and will continue to advocate for comprehensive care for the women we serve. I believe this legislation is a major step in the right direction to improving women’s health and improving health outcomes for all Americans.

Check out these links to learn more about ACA and how it will affect you:

Prevention, Wellness, and Comparing Providers (HealthCare.gov)

Benefits for Women and Children of New Affordable Care Act Rules on Expanding Prevention Coverage (HealthCare.gov)

Effective Date: Women’s Preventive Health Coverage Requirements (ACOG)

Barbara S. Levy, MD, is vice president of health policy at ACOG.

Opening Our Office Doors to the Transgender Community

As ob-gyns, our goal is to provide the very best health care for our patients, regardless of age, race, ethnicity, religion, marital status, immigrant status, handicap, sexual orientation, or gender identity. Unfortunately, there are segments of our population that, for a variety of reasons, have problems getting necessary health care, whether due to poverty, a lack of health insurance, living in a rural setting, or fear of discrimination.

One group that often experiences problems with access to health care includes transgender individuals. That’s why ob-gyns are being encouraged to do more to provide for their care. The fact is that transgender people share many of the same health care needs as everyone else. By instituting non-discrimination policies, ensuring confidentiality, and referring to patients by their preferred name, physicians can help make transgender individuals feel welcome in their offices.

We want the transgender community to know that we care about their health and can provide screenings, preventive care, and other appropriate services. Many transgender individuals who were assigned female sex at birth but live as male will need breast and reproductive organ screening. Male-to-female individuals who have had genital reconstruction may need cancer screening of the neovagina and breast cancer screening if they take hormones. 

By working together, we can ensure that our transgender patients receive the health care that they need.