A Positive Step Toward Preventing Unplanned Pregnancy

The recent US recession did more than make us simply tighten our belts. It’s made many families think long and hard about contraception and when to have children. Research has shown that more women are delaying pregnancy since the start of the recession.

Tough economic times have also led to an increased need for publicly funded family planning services, especially among poor women, who are more likely to have an unintended pregnancy than women of higher socioeconomic status. Today, the Guttmacher Institute released some encouraging statistics—researchers found that publicly funded family planning efforts led to 2.2 million fewer unplanned pregnancies in the US in 2010. Guttmacher estimated that if not prevented these pregnancies would have resulted in more than 1 million unplanned births and more than 760,000 abortions. Additionally, the study showed that every dollar spent on contraceptive services yields $5.68 in public health care cost savings.

These new data underscore what women’s health professionals have known all along: that publicly funded family planning services provide an invaluable safety net for reproductive-age women. It’s great news to see these programs make a real difference in preventing unplanned pregnancy and its consequences.

ACOG has long supported the expansion of the Title X Family Planning program—the nation’s only family planning program dedicated to serving low-income and uninsured individuals regardless of their ability to pay. We will continue to advocate on behalf of the nearly 9 million women who use publicly funded services to ensure that all women—no matter their income—have access to the reproductive health services they need.

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Guest Blog: With the ACA, Many Ounces of Prevention

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Have you ever heard the phrase “an ounce of prevention = a pound of cure”? It’s an often-used mantra in the medical community and a message we continuously repeat to our patients. That’s because intervention through prevention makes good sense. In many cases, catastrophic illness can be avoided by nipping small problems in the bud or diagnosing and treating disease early. In addition to living a healthy lifestyle, regularly visiting your doctor for routine screenings and counseling is paramount to achieving this goal.

As women, we are often the primary (or sole) caregiver for our families—not to mention the cook, head nurse, and chief financial officer among many other roles. Without a second thought, we may put the needs of others before our own. This is especially true if money is tight and it’s a decision between getting an annual well-woman exam, paying $50 for a birth control prescription, or meeting the needs of a child, spouse, parent, or friend. But this philosophy doesn’t serve women well—if you’re sick, who will look after the people you care about?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA)—the new US law that expands health care coverage by making health care more affordable and accessible—focuses on expanded access to preventive services. Making preventive services available for little or no out-of-pocket cost makes it easier for women to do the right thing for their health and put themselves first. As I discussed in my last post, a growing number of women are now eligible to receive contraception and other preventive health services without a co-pay.

Preventive services that are now covered include:

  • Annual well-woman visit
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing
  • Preventive vaccinations including HPV, flu, hepatitis A & B, shingles, and chicken pox
  • Sexually transmitted disease prevention counseling
  • Obesity screening and counseling
  • Smoking cessation
  • Depression screening

The ACA chips away at many of the barriers to access and care that women have faced for years. Here at ACOG, we’re closely monitoring the implementation of the law and will continue to advocate for comprehensive care for the women we serve. I believe this legislation is a major step in the right direction to improving women’s health and improving health outcomes for all Americans.

Check out these links to learn more about ACA and how it will affect you:

Prevention, Wellness, and Comparing Providers (HealthCare.gov)

Benefits for Women and Children of New Affordable Care Act Rules on Expanding Prevention Coverage (HealthCare.gov)

Effective Date: Women’s Preventive Health Coverage Requirements (ACOG)

Barbara S. Levy, MD, is vice president of health policy at ACOG.

Guest Blog: The Co-Pay Question—Contraceptive Access Under the ACA

Barbara S. Levy, MD

Barbara S. Levy, MD

If you’ve been to the pharmacy or doctor’s office lately, there’s a good chance that you noticed something different about your bill—there may not have been one. Depending on what type of insurance you have, you may now be eligible to receive all FDA-approved contraception and other preventive health services without a co-pay. This is due to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a law with a lofty goal: overhauling our current health care system to provide the majority of Americans with affordable access to health care. While the intricacies of the ACA—and health insurance policies—are complex, it’s important for women to understand these most recent changes because they so specifically apply to us.

Whether or not you still have a co-pay for contraceptives depends on where you get your health insurance. More than half of people in the US get their insurance either through their job or by purchasing an individual insurance plan. Currently, the contraceptive coverage provision applies to most of these private plans. Insurance companies that adopted ACA policy changes early on may have already updated their plans to offer free contraception beginning in August 2012. As time passes, more plans will comply. However, there are some exceptions—some plans have grandfathered status that gives them more time to meet the terms of the new requirements, and some religiously affiliated organizations are currently exempt from providing this coverage.

State Medicaid programs already provide no-cost contraception to enrollees. The ACA expands Medicaid’s reach, potentially decreasing the number of uninsured women ages 19–64 from 20% to 8%. Many states are still hammering out exactly how Medicaid provisions will be implemented. ACOG is following this issue closely and supports the adoption of the ACA’s Medicaid expansion in all states.

So how can you find out whether your plan has changed and what new services are covered? You’ll need to ask a few questions and then update your records to be sure your health care team (you, your insurer, pharmacy, and your doctor) is on the same page:

  • Ask your employer or your health insurer whether the ACA has caused any significant changes to your plan. If so, what are they, and specifically, is contraception now covered without a co-pay?
  • If there are updates to your plan, be sure to notify your pharmacy and your doctor’s office and report any problems to your plan administrator or insurance company. It’s up to you to be sure you’re being charged correctly based on what your policy covers.

As an ob-gyn, I am thrilled by the increased availability of no-cost contraception that the ACA provides. Contraception is a basic health necessity for women. More access puts women in the driver’s seat, helping us avoid unintended pregnancy and take control of our reproductive health.

Learn more about contraceptive coverage and the ACA.

Barbara S. Levy, MD, is vice president of health policy at ACOG.